• Exclusives

    Braves Again Boast Big Upside, and “What If?” …

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – The initial day of February. Friday night in the capital city. The weather has warmed a bit, thankfully. The Super Bowl is here this weekend, all the beauty and class of Atlanta shining bright on the world’s biggest sporting stage.

    In the lab this evening doing what I always do when this weekend rolls around: prepping for my fantasy baseball draft.

    (No, I’m not going to talk fantasy baseball. Nobody cares about my fantasy team … oh, and nobody cares about your fantasy team, either.)

    It’s this time of year, when the NFL prepares to crown a champion and we start to get the slightest tease of spring weather, when my thoughts turn toward which players I will select on draft day. And regardless of whether or not you play fantasy sports, you’re a baseball fan. You look ahead to the season and wonder what will happen.

    Fantasies are not a bad thing. Sometimes, they can be downright fun. No, you can’t spend all your time dreaming of what life would be like if this or that happened (news flash: nobody cares about that either). While some fantasies aren’t practical – no, my dude, she’s not walking through that door – considering the possibilities is critical to building a good fantasy roster and, in reality, a winning baseball team.

    Let’s consider these 2019 Atlanta Braves, a work still evolving as baseball’s free agency freeze continues to keep the biggest dominoes on ice. We know enough to at least sit back, enjoy a weekend beverage, take a break from the Super Bowl hoopla and all that comes with it, and let our fantasies stretch their legs. What if …

    Ronald Acuna really is THIS good: Yeah, that’s a lot to put on a kid who’s been 21 for all of six weeks, but here we are. That’s what happens when you hit .293 with a .917 OPS as a rookie while making every leadoff at-bat must-see TV in the second half. Certainly, it isn’t fair to ask Acuna to slug 1.028, hit .322 and carry the lineup across a full season – as he did in 68 games after the All-Star break – but it’s tantalizing to think what he could do being in the lineup for 155 games.

    Ender Inciarte’s 2019 as a whole is closer to his 2018 second half: The three-time Gold Glove center fielder struggled at the plate in the first half, which isn’t breaking news when you look at his career splits (.263/.314/.349 first half; .315/.361/.432 second half). Following an especially discouraging .241 average with a .649 OPS in the first half, Inciarte hit .302 with a .794 OPS after the break. A more consistent season could go a long way to helping the Braves lengthen the lineup.

    Sean Newcomb takes a step in 2019 similar to Mike Foltynewicz’s progress in 2018: The left-hander nearly joined Foltynewicz on the All-Star team after a stellar first half (3.51 ERA, 1.276 WHIP), and fell one strike short of a no-hitter July 29 against the Dodgers. But after throwing that 134th pitch on Hall of Fame Sunday, Newcomb pitched to a 5.68 ERA over his final 10 appearances. Folty’s step forward last season came in career starts 66 through 96; Newcomb begins this season with 49 career starts.

    Dansby Swanson makes it through 2019 with no wrist issues: The Atlanta native missed the NLDS with a partially torn ligament in his left wrist, resulting in offseason surgery and removal of a lima-bean sized growth. Swanson hit .340 through 12 games before feeling wrist discomfort for the first time during a raw, rainy April day in Chicago. By the time he hit the disabled list May 2, Swanson’s average had dropped to .289, and a .213/.296/.376 slash line in the second half only puts more focus on his health and his production in the season to come.

    Josh Donaldson reverts back to something close to his pre-injury form: The 33-year-old makes a childhood dream come true by joining the Braves but there is an asterisk, considering he missed 110 games last season with injuries and 49 games in 2017. A stark difference from 2013-16, when Donaldson never missed more than seven games in a single season. In that span, all he did was average 33 homers a season while slugging .518 and finishing in the top four in MVP voting three times, winning the award in 2015. An MVP season isn’t needed, but close to 30 homers and 135 games played would give the lineup a tremendous boost.

    Mike Soroka’s shoulder is healthy and he makes 25 starts: For all the wonderment around Atlanta’s vast array of young arms, the 21-year-old Canadian showed more than enough poise and control in a small sample size to consider him a strong candidate for a rotation spot. Right shoulder issues limited him to five big-league starts, but if he is healthy and has a good spring, Soroka will get the ball every fifth day in Atlanta. And if first impressions (3.82 ERA, 2.96 strikeout-to-walk ratio) hint of things to come, the Braves may have a developing staff ace on their hands.

    Soroka dreamed as a child of manning the blueline for his hometown Calgary Flames, a far cry from Donaldson (an Alabama kid) and Swanson (who attended high school nine miles from SunTrust Park). But their dreams have brought them to Atlanta at a time when Braves fans are dreaming big for the first time in more than five years.

    Tis the season. Dare to dream, let your mind wander a bit, gaze toward the future and wonder, “what if.”

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.