• Major League Baseball

    44 Forever: Aaron Meant So Much to Braves, But Impact Traveled Further Than Any Home Run

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – You grow accustom to it after a while, the roaring cheers every time the legends gather. Be it the two-time MVP from Oregon, the provider of the run that won the World Series, or the guy with bad knees whose slide at home plate is seared in this franchise’s history, there is no shortage of people revered by the Braves fanbase.

    And yet, one set of cheers always topped them all. You didn’t even have to see him shuffling out of the dugout or sitting in the back of a car circling the warning track to know. Just close your eyes, and listen.

    Not the Big Three aces, or the cocky kid from Florida, or the Skipper, or the Architect. Not even Murph or Justice or Bream or the various heroes who helped a baseball franchise not just take root in the South, but grow from sea to shining sea and beyond.

    No, the loudest cheers always were reserved for The King. The Hammer. Henry Louis Aaron, he of the quick, smooth swing that drove more home runs out of big-league ballparks than any right-handed slugger in major-league history. He who provided Atlanta with its first signature sports moment with the world watching. He who, more than anyone else, defined the Atlanta Braves.

    Hank Aaron passed away Friday morning in his sleep, the 86-year-old becoming the 10th Hall of Famer to die since June. The past four weeks have been remarkably cruel for Braves fans. Phil Niekro, the beloved knuckleballer who spent his retirement just across the lake from here in Flowery Branch, died Dec. 27. Don Sutton, who spent nearly 30 years in the broadcast booth before health issues sidelined him in 2019 and 2020, passed away Monday night.

    It hurts. They all hurt. Our team’s legends aren’t supposed to die. When it happens, we grieve as if they are family.

    Because they are.

    The Hammer: Hank Aaron played nine seasons with the Atlanta Braves after the franchise moved from Milwaukee before the 1966 season.

    My grandfather used to tell me three things about Aaron. First were the hands and wrists, formed from working on trucks delivering ice blocks as a kid. Big hands. Strong wrists. Powerful forearms. Perfect for belting baseballs 400-plus feet. Second, Aaron learned to bat cross-handed, the right-hander putting his left hand higher on the bat than his right. Try to swing a bat like that; Aaron didn’t adjust his hands properly until he was already playing in the minor leagues.

    Third, and most important, my grandfather said Aaron’s strength wasn’t just physical. I would learn as I grew older what that meant, as I read the well-documented stories of hate and ignorance directed toward a black man chasing a white man’s hallowed record in the Deep South in that era. Just to do his job in that environment was noteworthy and commendable, not knowing what potential threat lurked in the upper reaches of the ballpark or by the back entrance of the hotel Aaron used when the team was on the road.

    All the more remarkable – while inhabiting that fishbowl that grew more claustrophobic the closer he crept to Babe Ruth’s record of 714 career homers – that Aaron kept his cool, never cracked under the pressure, never lashed out. He simply did what we all seek to do: show up at work and do his best, with grace and humility.

    While bigots and racists threatened his life – resulting in the Braves taking extra security precautions and the FBI protecting his family – Aaron’s production didn’t wane as the gap to Ruth’s homer mark decreased. Aaron belted a career-high 47 homers in 1971, leading the majors in OPS (1.079) and slugging percentage (.669) while batting .327 and driving in 118 runs in 139 games. Two seasons later, at age 39, Aaron hit .301 with a 1.045 OPS, 40 homers and 96 RBIs in 120 games.

    The signature moment would come the following spring, on that famous Monday night in April – the first time the sports world had turned its laser focus on Georgia’s capital city. Aaron’s fourth-inning homer off Al Downing of the Dodgers and subsequent, joyous reaction from more than 53,000 inside Atlanta Stadium prompted legendary Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully to tell his audience:

    “What a marvelous moment for baseball. What a marvelous moment for Atlanta and the state of Georgia. What a marvelous moment for the country and the world. A black man is getting a standing ovation in the Deep South for breaking a record on an all-time baseball idol.”

    Marvelous, indeed. A moment of celebration, the first of many for the Braves franchise that a decade later, Aaron would help foster as director of player development. Justice. Gant. Glavine. Lemke. Jones. Names synonymous with the Braves emergence from perennial NL West doormat to 1990s powerhouse, all drafted with Aaron as part of the front office.

    I remember the chills I got seeing Aaron walking out onto the field at Atlanta Stadium after the final regular-season game in 1996, flashbulbs popping all over the circular stadium as the crowd roared. He was there when Turner Field – located at 755 Hank Aaron Drive – opened seven months later. There he was in 2016, helping deliver home plate after the final game at Turner Field to the construction site where the next spring, SunTrust Park would host its first game – Aaron throwing the first pitch to Bobby Cox on an April evening in 2017.

    New Home: Hank Aaron helps deliver home plate from Turner Field to SunTrust Park following the Braves finale at their downtown ballpark on Oct. 2, 2016. Aaron would throw out the first pitch at the new stadium on April 14, 2017.

    Aaron always was there. The Braves honored him at their new spring training site in North Port, Fla., shortly before the pandemic shut down spring training. He congratulated Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman on winning the Hank Aaron Award – given to the best offensive player in each league – just a few weeks ago.

    No matter what, when it came to the Braves, there was Aaron.

    And now, he’s gone. I can’t even fathom what it will be like when things return to normal, we return to the ballpark for opening night, or this summer’s All-Star game, and he won’t be there. It just won’t feel right.

    Sure, it’s certainly not unexpected for someone to pass away after 86 years. It just felt like Hank Aaron would live forever, which explains in part the hole in the collective heart of Braves Country tonight.

    We’re left with memories of one of the greatest players to ever step foot on a major-league field, a man who impacted a city, a region and society in ways that go far beyond the foul lines and resonate for reasons far more important than wins and losses.

    And we remember the cheers. The loudest ones of all, always and forever, are reserved for The Hammer.

    In lieu of flowers, the family has requested donations be made to Aarons’ Chasing the Dream Foundation:

    Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation

    3466 Buffington Center

    Atlanta, GA 30349

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Anthopoulos, Braves Enter Winter Meetings With Holes To Fill

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    WOODY GAP, Ga. — A brisk December afternoon finds winter’s chill riding the northwest breeze across the North Georgia mountains. A scattering of bundled-up hikers cross Ga. 60 at the Union County/Lumpkin County line, navigating the rocky trails at a site where snow fell for most of the afternoon just five days earlier.

    This place sits 88 miles from my upper-deck seats at Truist Park. As with so many things in 2020, that slice of normalcy feels a million miles away.

    Today’s view, a stop on this Saturday’s winding journey around and over the hilly terrain of my home state, is perfect for pause and perspective. The Winter Meetings — often a point of both decision and pivot for baseball’s offseason — kick off Sunday. Much like everything else in this year unlike any other, it will be different. Virtual. No meeting in suites. No hallway conversations. No ideas bandied about while sharing a drink or a meal.

    Looking Ahead: A brief pause before the Winter Meetings begin.

    Like the hikers determining which path to take after crossing the highway, the Atlanta Braves sit pondering choices of direction at a couple of key checkpoints in filling out the 2021 roster. You can cross the starting rotation off Alex Anthopoulos’ shopping list, the Braves general manager inking Drew Smyly and Charlie Morton last month to a pair of one-year pacts for $26 million.

    That last part stands out to me. The naysayers who lean on the worn-out narrative that the Braves don’t spend money conveniently forget the spending spree of last offseason, when Atlanta bolstered its roster to the point it would’ve hit opening day with a payroll of around $155 million.

    Atlanta has 11 players under guaranteed contracts for approximately $95.05 million in 2021 (including Smyly and Morton), with an estimated potential (per FanGraphs and MLB Trade Rumors) of $13 million more to four players in arbitration. Add in the up to $4.16 million if the contracts tendered to Luke Jackson, Johan Camargo and Grant Dayton become full, and that’s a 2021 number so far of approximately $112.21 million.

    Spending $26 million of that on the Smyly/Morton duo leads me to think even with pandemic-impacted finances, the Braves still have significant money to spend. They certainly have needs to add to a core that came within one win of the NL pennant.

    Pause and perspective; two words that at times are hard for fans to grasp. A few thoughts as I gaze at the mountains in the distance and think about a franchise aiming to reach the summit.

    We Should Marcellebrate: I know Anthopoulos doesn’t like long-term deals. I know the organization is loath to pay top dollar over a lengthy timeframe. I know the ongoing — and ridiculous — fact MLB and the Players Association have yet to determine if the DH remains in the NL for 2021 plays a factor not just for the Braves, but for every Senior Circuit club.

    I also know what I saw from Marcell Ozuna in a Braves uniform. No, I do not expect a Triple Crown-contending campaign to be the baseline. No, I admit his defensive shortcomings in left field give me pause.

    I also know the impact of having that type of right-handed bat behind reigning NL MVP Freddie Freeman (if I may briefly digress: how awesome it was to type that). It’s why I advocated re-signing Josh Donaldson last winter, a player almost five years older and one with a longer injury history.

    I don’t anticipate something happening with Ozuna until the DH is decided. It’s immaterial to me. Sure, it’s not my money, but I’d pony up a four-year deal at $88 million ($22 million average annual value, or AAV). I think that’s what it will take to sign him. I’d live with the defense in left field for one season to know the biggest hole in the lineup is filled through 2024.

    It’s a Marcellebration: Braves slugger Marcell Ozuna’s selfies became a symbol of the 2020 postseason.

    Anthopoulos likes to jump the market. I’d love to see him do it with Ozuna. Do I think it will happen? Honestly, no. I expect the Braves to fill the lineup hole via trade, perhaps a one-year “rental” of former MVP Kris Bryant to play third base and/or left field, citing one oft-mentioned example that doesn’t excite me like it did last winter or the winter before.

    Either way he goes, Anthopoulos has no choice but to nail this move. It’s his biggest to date in his tenure. The bat acquired has to be impactful. And while it shouldn’t have to be said, just for the record, piecing together a solution in-house is unacceptable. All the more reason in my opinion to be aggressive and maybe a bit uncomfortable here, and stretch to give Braves Country a reason to Marcellebrate.

    Gold Glove Bullpen Piece: One of the more memorable (and enjoyable) images from the NLCS was closer Mark Melancon gloving not one, but two Ozzie Albies homers belted into the Braves bullpen.

    No Bull, This Glove’s Legit: Braves closer Mark Melancon caught two Ozzie Albies homers in the bullpen during the NLCS.

    Melancon, a free agent expected to net somewhere between $4 million and $8 million, has spent the offseason cracking up the masses on social media. From my perspective, he should spend next season cracking down on opposing hitters in the ninth inning for the Braves.

    I’ve heard multiple people I trust say they expect the 35-year-old (he turns 36 in late March) to re-sign with Atlanta. Melancon’s return would provide the Braves one more impactful arm needed to go with Will Smith and Chris Martin — plus lefties Tyler Matzek and A.J. Minter — to form another formidable bullpen.

    I’d think $6 million-$7 million gets it done, but be patient. The reliever market is flooded, even more so now after the non-tender deadline. It might be mid-January, but unless someone blows him away with an offer, I expect Melancon back in 2021.

    One More Bloom: Atlanta needs a backup catcher, but for multiple reasons there is zero reason to spend significant money here.

    Travis d’Arnaud figures to catch a majority of the time — Braves catchers typically split duties in part to the toll of the Atlanta summer heat, but d’Arnaud could be in line for 130 starts after his breakout 2020. Atlanta has two highly regarded catching prospects in William Contreras and Shea Langeliers, but the loss of minor-league ball in 2020 dictates both need to catch every day somewhere in 2021 and not ride the bench in Atlanta.

    Alex Jackson could handle the staff fine for 35 starts at the major-league minimum salary. But I know how highly the organization regards Tyler Flowers. With roots in Atlanta and likely limited opportunities elsewhere if he wanted to try and catch on with another organization, I could see the Braves bringing Flowers back for cheap (say, $1.5 million, or roughly $1 million more than Jackson’s salary).

    California Dreamin’: There was a little buzz when the Angels tabbed Braves exec Perry Minasian as their GM, in particular given a certain Braves star and newly minted MVP who has California roots and an expiring deal.

    Dream on. I don’t see any scenario in which Freeman leaves the Braves. My feeling all along has been a contract extension will be done before the season begins. Doing so avoids Freeman’s status being a talking point all season, and gives the Braves cost certainty at the position for the foreseeable future.

    M-V-Free: Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman enters the final year of his contract after winning NL MVP honors.

    Until I see otherwise, I think Atlanta will do right for Freeman and the two sides will settle somewhere around $185 million for seven years ($26.4 million AAV). And no, the first baseman should not take a “hometown discount,” and fans have no right to expect that he should.

    Doting on Duvvy: Closing out today with a hat tip to Adam Duvall, whose pinch-hit homer off Jack Flaherty in Game 2 of the 2019 NLDS was such a cool moment to experience. Cool beyond how the crowd shifted from annoyance with Brian Snitker’s decision to hit Duvall for Mike Foltynewicz to euphoria when Duvall deposited a 3-2 offering over the wall in center, but because of the ease that comes with rooting for a guy like Duvall and the significance of him delivering in that moment.

    Duvall’s story — his living with Type 1 diabetes, his work at Triple-A after not breaking camp with the team in 2019, his prolific 10-game span this season in which he belted nine homers (including two three-homer games) — is well known. He made quite an impression on this fanbase. To this day, I have not met one person who does not like Duvall.

    I was surprised he got non-tendered, but I hope he lands a starting gig and a good payday somewhere. He’s certainly deserving.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Back Where It Started: Braves, Morton Reunite With One-Year Deal

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – A dozen years is a long, long time. I’m reminded of that every time I look at my kids … or look in the mirror.

    How long is a dozen years? Let’s go back to 2008. Some dude (me) started a lonely little Braves blog called BravesToday.com. He thought it would be fun to write about the ballclub every day. He even opened an account on some weird, new social media site called Twitter to occasionally promote the blog.

    Timing is everything in life, and the timing wasn’t great in this instance. Those Braves lost 90 games, the first time an Atlanta team had dropped that many games since 1990, the year before the worst-to-first Miracle Braves kicked off the franchise’s magical run. The company who hosted the blog went bankrupt. That Twitter account got ignored for a year or two.

    There wasn’t a whole lot to write about in that summer of ‘08. Chipper Jones was hitting .400 in June and ended up winning the NL batting title at .364. Otherwise, it wasn’t much fun. But there were a couple of bright spots.

    One came on a Saturday in Anaheim in June, when one of the Braves projected future aces made his major-league debut by holding the Angels to three runs on five hits with one walk and four strikeouts in six strong innings. 24-year-old Charlie Morton, who the club selected in the third round of the 2002 draft, threw 64 of his 104 pitches for strikes that night in besting future Brave legend Ervin Santana and pulling Atlanta within one game of .500 at 34-35.

    The rest of the story: not as fun. Morton gave up five runs or more four times in his other 14 starts, finishing 4-8 with a 6.15 ERA. By the following June, he was gone from the organization. The Braves finished 72-90, 20 games out of first place in the NL East. Their next playoff appearance was two years away.

    Now we hit the fast-forward button to today. The Braves and Morton have reunited, agreeing to a one-year, $15-million deal. It’s the second move in eight days Atlanta has made to add to a starting rotation that endured a death march of injuries and underperformance in 2020, following last week’s one-year, $11-million agreement with Drew Smyly.

    Smyly is a nice piece based on his short body of work down the stretch in 2019 for Philadelphia and seven appearances in 2020 for San Francisco.

    Morton is much, much more impactful.

    Charles in Charge: Charlie Morton won his first three postseason starts in 2020, including striking out six in 5 2/3 shutout innings in Game 7 of the American League Championship Series to pitch the Rays to the World Series.

    After being dealt to Pittsburgh in the awful Nate McLouth deal in June 2009, Morton had surgeries on both hips with Tommy John surgery mixed in for good measure across the next five seasons. Once he finally got healthy, he shifted from pitching to contact (6.3 strikeouts-per-nine-inning ratio from 2008-2015) to relying on velocity.

    Since the start of 2017, Morton has a 10.6 strikeouts-per-nine rate, and owns a 3.34 ERA and 3.27 FIP in 97 starts for the Astros and Rays, posting a 1.159 WHIP, 7.4 hits-per-nine innings and a 3.57 strikeouts-to-walks ratio. From his debut through 2016, Morton threw more than 145 innings twice. He’s surpassed that in each of his previous three full seasons (146 2/3 in 2017, 167 in 2018, 194 2/3 in 2019).

    It’s paid off in more ways than one. Morton closed out Game 7 of the 2017 World Series for Houston and in 12 postseason appearances since 2017 has posted a 3.40 ERA with a .644 OPS. He made the All-Star team in 2018 and 2019, finished third in the AL Cy Young voting in 2019, and signed a two-year, $30-million deal with Tampa Bay after the 2018 season.

    Now, a dozen years after those six innings in Anaheim, Morton returns to where it all began.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    The Time Between: Cleaning Out the Notebook After a Remarkable Run and Before an Unpredictable Winter

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – The dream slips out the door and the numbness rushes in, like that first cool northwest breeze in autumn informing you those 90-degree days are soon to be a distant memory.

    There are reminders in the transition between the end of the run and the start of preparing for the next one – the time between, as I opined on social media – when you have a realization, a proverbial stubbing of your toe, that sends a painful “what could’ve been” coursing through your veins.

    That moment came during an innocent walk up the stairs from the Braves Room earlier today. I looked down at my Atlanta All-Star game 2021 T-shirt and it hit me: With one more run, one more play, one more win, Brian Snitker would have managed the National League All-Star team in his home ballpark next July.

    Hello, frosty wind. Where’s my hoodie?

    Welcome to that weird time between the conclusion of the Braves memorable 2020 season and the commencement of serious thought toward 2021 and beyond. No, I’m not ready to go there. Not yet. Not because I’m bitter or anything over the way the NL Championship Series ended – yes, you have to win a series you lead 3-1, but this wasn’t 1996 or 2019 or 2005 or 1998 or 2011 or several other undigestible finishes to seasons past.

    I’m not there because I’m taking a moment to pause, to reflect.

    To clean out the notebook, so to speak:

    Winning a championship isn’t easy. The sooner some realize that truth, the better – and I know it’s hard in this, “I want it yesterday and then I want another one right now, patience be darned” society in which we live. Or, as a mentor used to tell me while showing me after deadline what changes he made to my copy and why, “if this was easy, everybody would do it.”

    Nobody ever will associate patience or perspective with this fanbase (at least some of the louder segments online). Hey, I get it. It’s been 25 years (minus one week) since I sat in the upper reaches of Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium and watched Marquis Grissom glove the final out of the World Series. But if you’ve watched this franchise grow across the past three seasons and don’t think they will be among the short list of World Series championship contenders for the next several years, I don’t know what to tell you.

    Adam Duvall’s injury in his first at-bat of the NLCS was a bummer for a great dude whose power surge during the season was a sight to behold. I don’t think I’ve met one person who doesn’t love Duvall. But one man’s misery is another man’s moment, and boy, Cristian Pache sure did impress against the Dodgers. The quality of his ABs was far better than I expected. Defensively, he’s so smooth. Andruw-esque. Center field is his in 2021.

    The Braves have answered the Pache question. But let’s pump the brakes on the Drew Waters talk just a bit. Waters is a tantalizing talent, indeed, but struck out at an alarming rate in spring training before baseball shut down. Without a Triple-A season, I’d be hesitant to hand him left field come April.

    Waters, William Contreras, Tucker Davidson, Kyle Mueller. Four names that likely will impact the big-league Braves in the very near future. But due to 2020 being what it was, that time’s not here. Not yet. Soon, but not yet.

    The Braves have answered the Ian Anderson question, though. No more Triple-A for the 22-year-old unless he falls on his face. Barring injury or a bad spring, that kid should get the ball every fifth day for the big-league club. His playoff performance was beyond impressive, even grinding through his Game 7 start with subpar command. Anderson’s changeup is ridiculous, and he’s got a shot to be a fixture in Atlanta for a long, long time.

    It’s easy to talk about the kids for 2021. Free agents and trade targets, not so much. As baseball wraps up its final act of a season like no other, we now enter an offseason that holds the same description. What will teams do with payroll? What will the free-agent market look like?

    Nobody knows. Baseball’s never had a season where fans weren’t filling up the seats, buying nachos and beer and parking passes and T-shirts. Sure, operating expenses plunged along with revenue, but with no guarantees the stands will be packed come April, I’d expect front offices to enter the winter with at least some trepidation. (Cue the “Liberty Media is cheap” tweets.)

    And of course, it’s Major League Baseball. We have no idea when we’ll learn if the DH stays in the NL in 2021. That little trivial note will have a major impact on a particular right-handed slugger who sure did make the Braves of 2020 really good, and really fun.

    Yes, Freddie Freeman is a free agent after next season. No, it’ll never get to that point. Expect a lengthy extension to be announced before spring training.

    Mark Wohlers’ slider, Devonta Freeman’s missed block, Cliff Levington (and not Dominique Wilkins) having the ball in his hands, the Flames and Thrashers bolting north, the Falcons secondary making Danny White look like a Hall of Famer, second-and-26, Chris Burke, Sam Holbrook, a locked bullpen door in L.A., and any of a trillion other “oh God, Atlanta” moments have absolutely zero to do with missteps on the bases or Mookie Betts jumping out of the building.

    RIP the #RallyPotato. It was fun while it lasted. At least it vaulted Braves Twitter back into the national spotlight, albeit it with far less staying power than a certain golfer.

    Hat tip to the boys at Atlanta Baseball Talk, who are wrapping up their weekly Braves podcast after 14 years with episode No. 500 this weekend. To do a podcast for a year is a tremendous investment in time. Do it for 14 years? They deserve a spot in Monument Grove. Want to know how long they’ve been at it? Here’s the first episode, complete with reaction to the departure of Braves legend Bob Wickman.

    Thanks for setting the pace for the many great podcasts out there, fellas.

    Finally, I turned on Game 1 of the World Series on Tuesday and watched until the Dodgers took control. I know plenty of people who didn’t, the pain of coming so close still too raw and festering to put the proceedings in Arlington on their TV. I understand. I did the same thing in 1993. After the Braves ran down the Giants in the last great pennant race, Atlanta ran out of gas against the less-talented Phillies in the NLCS.

    For the first time in my life, I refused to watch the World Series. Not until Game 6, when I was at a buddy’s house, and the game was on (they were a little more mature than my 20-year-old arrogant and stubborn self). I watched the bottom of the ninth and saw Joe Carter’s famous walkoff homer, realized how cool that moment was, and learned in that moment that no matter what, this beautiful game goes on.

    Much as our world does. No matter the heartbreak or challenge or failure we encounter, the world keeps spinning. We’ve been reminded of that many times over during the past few months. No matter what, the sun indeed rises in the east the next morning.

    And before you know it, that sun will ascend over baseball fields in Florida and Arizona, where pitchers and catchers will check in and kick off this journey once again.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    DONE, BY ONE RUN: Braves Can’t Hold Early Game 7 Lead, Fall 4-3 as Dodgers Advance to World Series

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – They only lost three games in a row once in the regular season. They held an early lead in the decisive game of the National League Championship Series. They extinguished a 19-year playoff drought, and came agonizingly close to going to the World Series for the first time since the previous century.

    In the end, the Atlanta Braves simultaneously announced their arrival as a legitimate world championship contender and learned that even the smallest mistakes at the highest level of baseball can prove fatal to one’s title hopes.

    The Braves couldn’t close the door on this NLCS, losing three games in a row after building a 3-1 series advantage. The final nail was hammered shut by Cody Bellinger’s tiebreaking seventh-inning homer off Chris Martin, lifting the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 4-3 victory Sunday in Game 7 and a 4-3 victory in the series, and ending the most successful season by the Braves since the 1999 edition captured the pennant.

    There will be no World Series appearance for the Braves this season, a season nobody knew would even happen due to the pandemic. It was a 60-game sprint to an expanded playoffs where, once there, the Braves swept the Reds and Marlins to reach the NLCS against a Los Angeles franchise making its fifth consecutive LCS appearance.

    And while plenty went right for the Braves in the seven-game series, the missed opportunities in the final three games undoubtedly will stay with them for the months to come. A bit too many quiet offensive innings, a couple of costly baserunning mistakes.

    Consider it a lesson learned, as much as it hurts.

    Let there be no doubt: It hurts. Badly.

    “It’s an unbelievable experience for a really young team,” Braves manager Brian Snitker – whose lineup in Game 7 included five players age 26 or younger – told reporters postgame. “We made some mistakes. We shot ourselves in the foot.

    “In games like this, runs are so hard to come by.”

    The Braves got on the board in the top of the first in Game 7, a Marcell Ozuna chasing home Ronald Acuna Jr. for the game’s first run. Dansby Swanson belted a long homer in the second and Atlanta led 2-0. After the Dodgers tied it with two runs in the third on a Will Smith single, the Braves answered with an Austin Riley single to recapture the lead.

    Then came one of those moments everybody will remember, and not pleasantly.

    With runners on second and third and no outs, Nick Markakis hit a chopper to third. Swanson broke from third and found himself in a rundown, being tagged out running toward the plate. Riley, who was on second, tried to take third and was cut down, a double play on a ball hit 75 feet short-circuiting what could have been a huge inning.

    Seventeen Atlanta hitters would step into the batter’s box after; one reached, an Ozzie Albies walk in the sixth.

    Meanwhile, the Braves were dodging Dodgers threats left and right on the mound. They ran out of magic in the sixth. Shane Greene needed just 14 pitches to get through the fifth, but Snitker elected to go with A.J. Minter – who threw 42 pitches in starting Game 5 on Friday – to begin the sixth. The Dodgers countered with pinch-hitter Kiki Hernandez, who destroyed a 2-2 pitch to left-center to even the score at 3.

    In the seventh, Chris Martin got the first two outs quickly. He made a mistake over the plate to Bellinger, and the former MVP smashed it deep into the right-field seats for the Dodgers first lead of the game. It was the only lead they needed to win the pennant, Austin Riley flying out to Bellinger in center at 11:52 p.m. ET to extinguish Atlanta’s World Series dream one win short.

    Hernandez fouled off three pitches with two strikes before his homer; Bellinger did the same. Even down 3-1 in the series, the Los Angeles offense grinded out quality at-bat after quality at-bat against the Braves, whose vaunted bullpen finally ran out of gas after helping carry the team to the verge of the Fall Classic.

    It’s a tough ending for a team that not many thought had a shot to get here. There will be plenty of second guessing and what ifs asked in the days and weeks to come. Rightly so. But at the same time, allowing that to diminish what Atlanta accomplished in 2020 is a bit short-sighted.

    These Braves were so much fun to watch, at a time in our history when we all needed something to rally around and look forward to other than hospitalization numbers and unemployment figures. It’s incredibly disappointing to fall one run short of the World Series, no matter the environment surrounding the moment, but there is a bit of solace even as the Dodgers begin their celebration.

    For one, the Braves overcame so much just to get here. We don’t need to go chapter-and-verse into the injuries and underperformance. It’s a testament to their toughness. While we can and should point to the lack of execution in several key moments the past 48 hours, nobody can say this bunch didn’t try everything they could to push this ride into the final week of October.

    The biggest takeaway is the progress made from last season to now. While the end comes with the subtleness of running straight into a concrete wall – it always feels like that, doesn’t it? – this also feels like a continuation of this group’s growth. The experience of getting to this stage can’t be overstated. The expectations should continue to rise, and rightly so.

    With a young core in place, this figures not to be the only deep October push. And perhaps one October in the near future, it will be the Braves playing in the World Series, winning the championship the franchise has chased for a quarter-century. At this moment, the future is as bright as ever.

    Even if in the present it’s hard to see the light, through the tears and pain of a journey stopped just short.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    ONE LAST SHOT: Braves Take Final Swing at NL Pennant, World Series Berth as Dodgers Force Game 7

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – Two teams. One game. One pennant. One World Series berth. One season extender. One season ender.

    Zero margin for error.

    The Atlanta Braves have whiffed on two chances to end this National League Championship Series. They’re down to their last shot Sunday night. The Los Angeles Dodgers, who just two nights ago were down 3-1 in the series, used a 3-1 victory Saturday in Game 6 at Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas to square the NLCS at three games apiece and push this NL title bout to a decisive seventh game.

    The Braves have come a long way since the start of 2018, but after being unable to close out the proud and more experienced Dodgers, we’ve arrived at the ultimate intersection of sports heaven and hell:

    Game 7.

    They’re the two greatest words in sports … unless you find yourself in one. Then it is a torture chamber of emotions exhilarating and exhausting, dauting and devastating, sheer ecstasy and unconstrained pressure, all rolled into one frothing passion play that ends not just the series for the unfortunate loser and its fanbase, but its season.

    Win a Game 7, and you’ll smile at the memory for decades. Lose a Game 7, and you’ll spend a lifetime wondering what if.

    “Shoot, we’ll go out there and let ’er fly,” Braves manager Brian Snitker told reporters postgame – suffice to say he’d not checked social media, where plenty of Braves fans already were cliff-diving into the pool of doom and gloom. “It’s baseball.”

    Win or Winter: Braves manager Brian Snitker discusses Atlanta’s loss to the Dodgers in Game 6 of the NLCS.

    Perhaps that dread coming from Braves Country stems from their most recent experience in the winner-take-all aisle, the forsaken Game 5 of last season’s NL Division Series. Perhaps that experience, whatever one can take from that rotten late afternoon, will serve the Braves of 2020 well Sunday in what will be the franchise’s biggest game in at least two decades.

    The Dodgers know what this Game 7 business is all about, considering 11 members of their current 28-man roster were part of Los Angeles pennant-clinching victory over Milwaukee in Game 7 two seasons ago. It’s part of the reason so many national pundits picked Los Angeles to beat the Braves and reach its third World Series in the past four autumns.

    The final win of any series is the hardest to get, particularly against a squad ladened with playoff experience. Give plenty of credit to the Dodgers for forcing this engagement to its limit. Direct plenty of blame to the Braves for not closing out this series when they had the chance.

    While the missteps were not as egregious as in Friday’s 7-3 defeat in Game 5, the Braves couldn’t come through in a couple of key moments in Game 6.

    Things teetered on the brink early after Max Fried allowed back-to-back homers to Corey Seager and Justin Turner – followed by a walk and two singles – in a three-run first. Fried, the 27-year-old lefty who grabbed the reins as staff ace after Atlanta’s rotation imploded in the season’s first month, found his footing and kept the Braves in the game with a gutty effort.

    Fried didn’t another run and got the Braves into the seventh inning before succumbing after a career-high 109 pitches. Snitker lauded him for giving Atlanta a chance, but while Fried was posting zeros, his teammates were unable to get much going against four Dodgers pitchers.

    Going the Distance: The Braves fell 3-1 to Los Angeles in Game 6 of the NLCS on Saturday, forcing the series to a decisive seventh game Sunday night.

    The biggest moment to flip this game’s script came immediately after Fried doused the initial inferno. The Braves loaded the bases with no outs in the second, but Walker Buehler carved up the bottom of the Atlanta batting order. Austin Riley struck out on three pitches, Nick Markakis watched a called third strike, and rookie Cristian Pache grounded out.

    Singles from Travis d’Arnaud and Dansby Swanson gave the Braves two baserunners in the fourth, but Riley lined a 109-mph bullet to Cody Bellinger in center and Markakis ended the inning on a comebacker to the mound. Freddie Freeman singled in the fifth with two outs, but Mookie Betts robbed Marcell Ozuna of an RBI double with a leaping catch at the wall in right.

    Ozuna’s ball left the bat at 100.6 mph; the Braves hit 11 balls on this day 95 mph or harder. They finally broke through in the seventh on two balls that weren’t exactly scalded: Markakis greeting Blake Treinin with a triple to right (86.4 mph) and Ronald Acuna Jr. scoring him on a double to right (89.6 mph).

    That’s just one example of the fickleness that can decide any individual baseball game.

    In a Game 7, that type of thing can decide who plays on and who goes home.

    Plenty of pressure remains on the Dodgers. The only thing worse for Los Angeles than losing this series in five or six games would be losing Game 7. The Braves now have serious pressure on them for the first time in the series. With the pennant within its grasp the past two games, Atlanta went 3-for-20 with runners in scoring position and left 13 runners on base.

    For Atlanta, Sunday will serve as invaluable experience regardless of the outcome. The Braves hand the ball to 22-year-old right-hander Ian Anderson, 52 months removed from Shenendehowa High School in Clifton Park, N.Y., for his 10th major-league start. Four players age 23 or younger will join him in the starting lineup; another starter (Swanson) is 26.

    They’ll play the biggest game of their young lives, to decide a series joined at three games apiece.

    There are no more excuses for either side, and there is no tomorrow. Look how the week has unfolded. The Braves won two in a row. The two teams swapped one victory apiece. The Dodgers won two in a row. One could argue the Braves should be preparing for the World Series by now. One could say the same about the Dodgers.

    Somebody’s going to make it. One game to go, with the pennant and a shot at the ring hanging in the balance.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    PARTY POOPERS: Dodgers Make Braves Pay for Missed Opportunities, Force NLCS to Game 6

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – This has nothing to do with curses and jinxes and narratives long since exhausted, and everything to do with lack of execution and failure to seize opportunities.

    Leave third base a bit early on a ball caught in the outfield? Don’t drive home runners in the early innings? Fail to throw strikes during a tight spot? Sometimes in the regular season, those details get glossed over amid the blur of the daily march to October.

    But when you reach the 10th month of the year, you have to be on point at all times. The Atlanta Braves fell short in too many of those moments in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series on Friday, and that’s the biggest reason they will face the Los Angeles Dodgers on Saturday at Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas, instead of preparing for the World Series.

    The Braves had their chances but couldn’t take advantage, and the postseason-tested Dodgers made them pay in a 7-3 victory to keep their season alive. And while the Braves still lead the NLCS 3-2 and need just one win this weekend to capture the NL title and head to the World Series for the first time in 21 years, Friday served as a stinging reminder:

    Winning a pennant is not easy. They just don’t hand out trips to the Fall Classic like free samples at the mall food court. And the final win of a series is the hardest one to secure.

    If you get an opportunity, you best not waste it. If the disaster scenario unfolds this weekend and the Braves manage to lose games started by Max Fried (Saturday) and Ian Anderson (if Sunday’s Game 7 becomes necessary), they will rue the chances that slid through their fingers in Game 5.

    It started about as well as Brian Snitker could have dreamed. The Braves turned to A.J. Minter to kick off a bullpen game – welcome to life in 2020, with no off days in playoff series until next week. For Minter, it was his first start since his junior season at Texas A&M, and all the lefty did was strike out seven over three innings.

    Minter left with a 2-0 lead; it could’ve been more. The Braves collected five hits and two walks in the opening three innings, but scored only the pair of runs while stranding four runners on base.

    Atlanta actually put a third run on the scoreboard in the third, albeit briefly. Dansby Swanson’s sinking liner was snagged by Mookie Betts in right field, the former MVP stumbling as he picked the ball off his shoe tops. Marcell Ozuna, who began the inning with a single, left third base early and upon review was called out, the double play ending the inning.

    Regardless of how you feel about the whole momentum debate – which has raged across the airwaves and social media during this series – there’s no denying this game changed on the Ozuna blunder. The stumbles on this night don’t all fall on the loveable designated hitter, though.

    The Braves couldn’t cash in their chances in the early innings. It almost was jarring to see, considering Atlanta’s offense has scored four runs or more in one inning six times this postseason. In a bullpen game, a house of cards that can topple if just one reliever has an off night, three runs are not going to be enough most of the time.

    Not on this night, and certainly not against the Dodgers, who Friday played their 23rd NLCS game since 2016. And almost immediately after Ozuna’s run came off the board, Los Angeles did what the Braves could not.

    Take advantage.

    Corey Seager’s homer off Tyler Matzek in the fourth made it 2-1. And while the Braves still held the lead, you almost could feel what was coming next. Shane Greene wiggled out of trouble in the fifth, but left with two outs and one on in the sixth.

    Will Smith (the pitcher) came on and for the second straight night could not throw his slider for a strike, walking Max Muncy to extend the inning. That brought up Will Smith (the catcher), who golfed a 3-2 fastball into the left-field seats for a three-run homer and a 4-2 Dodgers lead.

    The Battle of Wills: The Dodgers catcher put Los Angeles ahead in Game 5 of the NLCS with a three-run homer in the sixth inning Friday.

    In the seventh, Jacob Webb was one strike away from getting out of the inning. Twice. Betts singled home a run on a two-strike pitch, and Seager followed with a two-strike, two-run homer.

    7-2 Dodgers. See you Saturday.

    Atlanta certainly wanted to spend the day shifting from pennant celebration to World Series preparation. There remains work to do, however. It’s playoff baseball, and the deeper you play, the more amplified the missed chances become. That’s part of it, a part the Braves and many members of their fanbase are learning on the fly.

    That’s not to suggest the Braves suddenly are gripped with overwhelming pressure. You can afford a stumble if you build a 3-1 series advantage, which the Braves did. Friday was Game 5, not Game 7. Fried pitched well in Game 1 and will be on full rest. Critical bullpen arms like Mark Melancon and Chris Martin also are fresh. Saturday is Snitker’s 65th birthday, and what would be a better present than a pennant and World Series berth?

    One also must think the Braves will have a heightened sense of urgency after a few stumbles Friday delayed the party for at least a day. The pressure remains squarely on the Dodgers, whose sole mission from the commencement of spring training is to win the World Series.

    But if this series isn’t over 24 hours from now, we’re having a completely different discussion.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    ON THE BRINK: Braves Bash Dodgers in Game 4, Sit One Victory from the World Series

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – The Atlanta Braves were pounded into submission in Game 3 of the National League Championship Series on Wednesday, and while they held a 2-1 advantage in the series even after allowing 11 runs in the first inning, you wouldn’t know it from listening to the national prognosticators who spent Thursday shoveling dirt on the Braves grave.

    This just in: those reports of the Braves demise were greatly exaggerated.

    And now, they’re one victory away from the World Series.

    Atlanta responded to that blowout loss with a breakout performance of its own, moving one step away from its first NL pennant and World Series trip in 21 years with a 10-2 rout of the mighty Dodgers in Game 4 of the NLCS at Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas.

    Catch your breath, folks. The Atlanta Braves, who 30 months ago were coming off four straight seasons of 89-plus losses, are THIS CLOSE to the Fall Classic. The sport’s grandest stage. A stage the franchise has graced just nine times since the NL and AL champs begin squaring off in 1903.

    They have three shots to punch their ticket, starting Friday night in Game 5. A fully rested Max Fried and Ian Anderson are lined up to start Games 6 and 7, if needed.

    Atlanta – and its championship-starved franchise – hope that’s not necessary. If Marcell Ozuna hits Friday like he did Thursday, you might as well print the T-shirts, snap some fake selfies and clear your calendar for next week. Ozuna helped fuel the Braves run to a third-consecutive NL East championship while putting up MVP-type numbers through the 60-game season, but has been relatively quiet in these playoffs.

    He entered Thursday hitting .200 in the postseason with a .565 OPS and 14 strikeouts in 35 at-bats. But the NL leader in homers and RBIs in the regular season was in the middle of things throughout Game 4, helping Atlanta deliver a definitive statement in a game that began with every member of the Fox Sports pregame crew (and honestly, probably 95 percent of the country) picking the Dodgers to even the series. David Ortiz lobbed the ultimate insult, picking Los Angeles to win 14-3.

    Yeah, about that, Big Papi.

    Ozuna became the first Braves player to homer twice in a postseason contest since Chipper Jones in the 2003 NLDS, and set a franchise record for most total bases in a playoff game with 11. He finished 4-for-5 with three runs scored and four RBIs, mixing it up and taking selfies the whole way.

    The first of his two homers on this night banged off the second deck in left field in the fourth inning, tying the game at 1. More importantly, it broke the seal against future Hall of Famer Clayton Kershaw. The big Los Angeles lefty was supposed to start Game 2, only to be scratched with back spasms, and Atlanta made him work Thursday.

    Lined up to face the three-time NL Cy Young award winner in Game 4 was Bryse Wilson, owner of seven career big-league starts who had not pitched in a competitive game since Sept. 27. Nobody gave the 22-year-old righty any chance of holding his own in such a pivotal game, one the Braves needed to keep the Dodgers from evening the series at two games apiece.

    All Wilson did in his playoff debut was baffle Los Angeles through six sparkling innings, surrendering only an Edwin Rios homer on a fastball over the middle of the plate in the third. Wilson used a fantastic breaking ball and a plus changeup with great control of his fastball to limit the powerful Dodgers lineup to just that one hit in six stellar innings, throwing 50 of his 74 pitches for strikes and pitching the game of his life.

    Owning the Moment: Bryse Wilson shined in his postseason debut, holding the Dodgers to one run on one hit in six innings in Game 4 of the NLCS.

    He didn’t allow the Rios blast to rattle him, retiring nine of the final 10 hitters he faced. He punctuated his outing with back-to-back 12-pitch innings in the fifth and sixth innings. On a day spent wondering how long he could go and could he keep the game close, Wilson didn’t just deliver.

    He dominated.

    “Wow,” Braves manager Brian Snitker told reporters postgame, summing up the mood everybody had in watching Wilson dazzle. “How he’d handle that situation, he answered that question.”

    And the Braves offense issued its own answer during a relentless six-run sixth, a 35-minute half-inning that turned a stomach-churning 1-all matchup into a margin with plenty of wiggle room. After Ronald Acuna singled and got second on a throwing error, it was likely NL MVP and team captain Freddie Freeman delivering the go-ahead double to right.

    The Braves were just getting started. Ozuna doubled home Freeman to send Kershaw to the showers, the veteran allowing four runs on seven hits in five-plus innings. After a Travis d’Arnaud lineout, the Braves seized control: an Ozzie Albies blooper, a Dansby Swanson double, an Austin Riley single, a Johan Camargo walk and a Cristian Pache single blowing things open.

    A Sweet Sixth: The Braves took control of Game 4 of the NLCS on Thursday with a six-run sixth.

    The Braves did what the Dodgers do so well: work counts and ambush mistakes and roll up runs with a deep lineup. Atlanta went 6-for-9 with runners in scoring position in the inning, delivering the biggest blows in the pivotal moments in the biggest game the franchise has played in forever.

    Friday night’s game is even bigger. And if the Braves can win just one more time, they’ll go play in the biggest games of them all.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    JUST ENOUGH: Braves Hold On At The Finish, Take 2-0 NLCS Lead

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – Supposedly, the Atlanta Braves owned the second-best lineup entering this National League Championship Series. Supposedly, their hitters could not work counts, lay off close pitches and string together quality at-bats like the Los Angeles Dodgers.

    And even though things got hairy in the bottom of the ninth, that offense had built just enough of a cushion to down the favorites from the west coast for a second consecutive day.

    It goes in the books as an 8-7 victory over the Dodgers in Game 2 of the NLCS on Tuesday at Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas. All seven Los Angeles runs came from the seventh inning on, and while it was a white-knuckle finish and certainly wasn’t pretty, the Braves avoided what would’ve been a disheartening collapse.

    Now they hold a 2-0 series lead. The Braves are halfway to the pennant, halfway to punching their ticket to the World Series. And even after a four-run ninth by Los Angeles, kept alive by an error from Ozzie Albies, this fact is indisputable:

    If the Dodgers are going to keep the Braves from winning the pennant, they must win four of the next five games.

    There was drama at the finish, and there was drama several hours before first pitch. The Dodgers scratched Clayton Kershaw due to back spasms. Los Angeles turned to Tony Gonsolin, a prized pitching prospect known for pounding the strike zone. All the right-handed did was mow through the first nine Braves in 28 no-stress pitches, while Atlanta rookie Ian Anderson struggled with command but kept the Dodgers off the scoreboard.

    Gonsolin’s dominance didn’t last long.

    Freddie Freeman followed Ronald Acuna Jr.’s leadoff walk in the fourth with his second homer in two games, staking Atlanta to a 2-0 lead. Gonsolin would need 33 pitches to close the frame and began the fifth at 61 pitches, delivering the first pitch of the inning to Austin Riley at 7:38 p.m. ET.

    The Dodgers recorded the third out 35 minutes later. In between, nine hitters came to the plate, four walked, four scored, the Los Angeles bullpen door opened twice, and the Braves tripled their lead. It was a doctorate-level class in how to grind down and chew up an opposing pitching staff, taught by the team many thought would be the students before the series started.

    Nick Markakis, who has struggled to catch up to velocity in the postseason, battled through a 10-pitch at-bat before drawing a walk off Gonsolin. Cristian Pache – the 21-year-old with four regular-season at-bats who started for Adam Duvall (season-ending oblique injury) – yanked a 3-2 pitch inside the third-base bag for a double to score Markakis and extend the lead to 3-0. Acuna followed with a five-pitch walk, and Gonsolin gave way to Pedro Baez.

    Freeman flicked his third pitch into center to score Pache, Acuna racing to third on the play. Marcell Ozuna and Travis d’Arnaud drew back-to-back walks to force home another run, and an Albies sacrifice fly to center made it 6-0. Dylan Floro struck out Dansby Swanson to end the inning, but not before Los Angeles needed 53 pitches to get three outs.

    But the postseason isn’t easy, and the Braves bullpen cracked for the first time this October. Darren O’Day gave up two hits and A.J. Minter surrendered a three-run homer to Corey Seager in the seventh to cut Atlanta’s lead to 7-3. In the ninth, Josh Tomlin gave up three runs, Max Muncy’s two-run shot pulling Los Angeles within 8-6.

    Melancon – who a few minutes earlier caught an Albies ninth-inning homer in the left-field bullpen for the second straight night – came on and saw his home-run tag-team partner boot Will Smith’s grounder that would’ve ended the game. Cody Bellinger tripled to the right-field corner to cut the lead to one, but Melancon got a groundout to end the madness.

    Some fans will hyper-focus on the harrowing final moments, but the Braves are in good shape. Minter had allowed a homer to exactly one of 88 hitters he faced before Tuesday. Tomlin’s not going to pitch the ninth inning unless there is plenty of margin for error. Albies makes that play 49 times out of 50.

    In October, there are no style points. It’s simple: find a way to win.

    The Braves have done it twice in two games.

    Do it two more times, and they’ll play in the World Series.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.




    FINE IN NINE: Late Power Show Vaults Braves in NLCS Opener

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – It started as Ronald Acuna Jr. walked to home plate for the first at-bat of the first game of the National League Championship Series on Monday. It echoed through Globe Life Field after a ninth-inning explosion washed away eight innings full of stranded runners, unexpected substitutions and for many fans, an impending feeling of doom.

    The chop and the chant, loud and proud and rolling through the stands in Arlington, Texas. If you listened closely enough, you probably heard it from every single part of Braves Country.

    Dead in the water offensively for eight innings against the mighty Los Angeles Dodgers – who the entire Fox Sports pregame crew anointed with the NL pennant before Acuna stepped into the batter’s box – it was the Braves serving notice they are here to play with a four-run ninth in a 5-1 victory and a 1-0 series lead.

    It’s a statement victory for a team playing on this stage for the first time in nearly two decades. It’s a shot across the bow that the Braves indeed feel this matchup between the two best teams in the Senior Circuit is much closer than many pundits spent Monday opining.

    It’s the type of moment that can vault a team to greater heights than even it dares to dream.

    The Braves stumbled and scuffled their way into and out of scoring opportunities all night, stranding 10 runners on base and finishing 1-for-12 with runners in scoring position. Brian Snitker, who managed brilliantly through Atlanta’s sweeps of Cincinnati and Miami to get to this point, pushed every button imaginable in the eighth inning to try and break the offensive stalemate.

    It didn’t work. Pablo Sandoval and Charlie Culberson came to the plate as pinch hitters – they combined for 11 plate appearances in the regular season. Sandoval hit for Cristian Pache, after the organization’s top prospect (who had four regular-season at-bats) was pressed into duty when Adam Duvall left with an oblique injury.

    It didn’t work. Sandoval was hit with a pitch. Culberson struck out. Bases left loaded. On to the bottom of the eighth, where the Braves deployed Sandoval at third base, moved Austin Riley to left, and stuck Culberson in right.

    In a 1-1 game.

    In Game 1 of the NLCS.

    And the Braves won, conventional thinking and wisdom and sense be damned.

    They did so because, as they often do, they found a way to mix up some late-inning magic. And this was the most delicious rally we’ve seen from this bunch since they exited the rebuild, because this was the biggest game they’ve played in years.

    Riley, swinging over the top of slider after slider in the ninth spot on Snitker’s lineup card, smashed a Blake Treinen pitch 448 feet into the left-field seats to snap that 1-all tie leading off the ninth. It opened a waterfall that saw Acuna double, Freddie Freeman launch a sacrifice fly 405 feet to dead center, Marcell Ozuna work a tremendous at-bat to serve a single to right for another run, and Ozzie Albies homer into the Braves bullpen.

    By the time the dust settled, the Dodgers were the ones looking up at a series deficit. And probably in a bit of shock, to be honest, even if the perennial NL powerhouse says the right things publicly. Treinen, Dave Roberts’ likely closer if Kenley Jansen can’t rediscover his velocity, gave up three runs on three hits while retiring one hitter.

    The Dodgers were lucky this didn’t end up as Atlanta’s fifth shutout in six postseason contents. Max Fried made one mistake, a hanging curveball to Enrique Hernandez in the fifth that was deposited into the seats to tie the game, but gave up just three other hits across six sparkling innings with two walks (both in the first inning) and nine strikeouts.

    Then the Braves bullpen took over. For all the chatter nationally about the depth of L.A.’s firemen, there is no doubt: Atlanta owns the best bullpen in baseball, and it shined in the NLCS opener. Chris Martin, Will Smith (the left-handed reliever, not the Dodgers catcher) and Mark Melancon teamed up for three scoreless innings of relief, Melancon pausing between warm-up pitches in the bullpen to catch Albies homer.

    It was that type of night for the Braves, who sit three victories from a World Series trip.

    There’s work to do before thinking about that, although you can be excused to dream a bit bigger. A seven-game series is not secured in Game 1, but it can send quite the message.

    Message delivered, along with a chop and a chant for good measure.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.