• Bobby Cox

    Freeman’s Patience Paying Off as October Nears

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – Imagine for a moment the mindset of Frederick Charles Freeman on this Wednesday evening, hours after wrapping up Game No. 1,178 of his stellar major-league career. Consider what the Atlanta Braves first baseman, team captain and face of the franchise – one who has grown from baby-faced slugging rookie to becoming the latest Braves “first-namer,” joining the likes of Hank, Murph, Chipper – must feel on this third Wednesday in September.

    You can add another title to Freddie Freeman, one he shares with Julio Teheran: Rebuild Survivor.

    The Braves welcome the Philadelphia Phillies to town starting Thursday, a four-game series that has Braves Country dreaming of champagne wishes and championship dreams. Atlanta begins its final homestand of this spell-binding 2018 season needing three wins this weekend to clinch its first National League East title since 2013, a team that found Teheran in the rotation and Freeman manning first base.

    The two lone holders from the last Atlanta team to play October baseball, a 96-win squad that fell in four games to the Dodgers in the NL Division Series. Teheran was bombed in a Game 3 start at Los Angeles while Freeman hit .313 in the series with four runs scored. My how long ago that seems, considering everything that has happened since.

    Through it all – a four-season stretch featuring 361 losses, a change in manager, a change in general manager, a change in home ballpark – Freeman hit .294 with a .911 OPS, 98 homers and 258 extra-base hits, despite having precious little protection around him in the lineup, two seasons short-circuited by injury, and the general pall of seeing almost every other teammate of value shipped elsewhere for kids barely old enough to shave … or drive.

    Think of how jarring that must have been for a player who grabbed 20 at-bats down the stretch in 2010, Bobby Cox’s final season as manager, one that found the Braves reaching the postseason. His 21 homers in 2011 dampened immeasurably by Atlanta’s September collapse, ending with Freeman grounding into a double play to end Game No. 162 – and the season.

    Sure, there was the 2012 wild-card berth clinched by a Freeman walk-off homer, Hall of Famer Chipper Jones standing at third base with one arm raised in an iconic image, only we all know how that playoff appearance ended. Then 2013, a first All-Star appearance in July followed by another visit to October. It was the end of an era, the dawn of what could be best described as a baseball nuclear winter.

    Now look at Freddie Freeman as 2018 began, a husband, a father, recovering from a wrist injury that cost him 45 games the season before, the veteran linchpin amid the emerging wave of young, yet unpredictable talent. He had hit above .300 each of the past two seasons, honing his craft as his prime years arrived amongst the darkness of a difficult rebuild that saw 2017 conclude with 90 losses, and an offseason that began with a front-office scandal.

    Just 5 ½ innings into the new season, the Braves trailed Philadelphia 5-0, the second season opening at new SunTrust Park looking so much like so many moments he endured through the past four years. But he slammed a 3-2 pitch into the right-field seats, a two-run shot accounting for the first two runs of the season and jump-starting an epic 8-5 come-from-behind victory. Philadelphia intentionally walked him in the ninth inning to get to Nick Markakis, who belted a three-run walkoff bomb just minutes before a thunderstorm unleashed a torrent of rain upon the delirious Braves fans leaving the ballpark.

    The Braves – and their captain – haven’t looked back.

    There is a myriad of reasons why a team reaches the playoffs, claims a division title, gives its fanbase the chance to dream of a pennant or a world title, a ticker-tape parade and memories to pass down for generations to come. These Braves have plenty of authors in this storybook surge to the brink of the postseason, all of whom we’ve waxed poetic about in the weeks and months leading up to this moment, all of whom we’ll tell our children and grandchildren about as we recall 2018 – perhaps in the way the previous generation revers 1991.

    But as it arrives, as Atlanta takes the field for its final 10 games of the regular season – a campaign that seems destined to continue behind Sept. 30 – take a minute to think about the first baseman who rode the descent, slogged through the valley, then helped his franchise rise anew with steady leadership on and off the field.

    For all who deserve credit for how the East will be won, when the moment comes, take a minute to think about Freddie Freeman. There he was Wednesday, with his team riding a four-game losing streak and a fanbase paralyzed by multiple faux pas in multiple sports in this city reaching for the panic button, preaching calm before delivering three hits and three RBIs in a much-needed victory over St. Louis that pushed the Braves ever closer to October.

    And when they get there, nobody will have earned the moment more than him.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Cooperstown Bound: The Incredible Career of Chipper Jones

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – The crowd gathered around the 23-year-old peach-fuzzed kid, who stared into the sea of microphones and cameras, and responded to question after question following a four-hit, four-RBI performance to help lift his team to victory.

    Part of that media scrum late in the evening on June 6, 1995, inside the cramped no-frills locker room of Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, included a 22-year-old peach-fuzzed kid holding a pen and a notepad. At some point amid the back-and-forth, the novice reporter summoned up the courage to ask the young baseball player what he hit to drive in two runs in a bases-loaded fourth inning, and followed up with a question about approach given that hit came on the first pitch while the other four at-bats of the night were worked deep into the count.

    The kid in the spotlight provided a quick analysis of his performance, giving the kid holding the notebook a couple of quotes that would land in a college newspaper’s weekly summary of recent Braves games.

    Some 277 months after that exchange, both those kids have kids of their own, are immersed into new realities, carry a few extra pounds and, yes, both have facial hair tinged with gray. Welcome to middle age, Chipper Jones, who Sunday will take his rightful place in baseball’s Hall of Fame, the crowning achievement of a 19-year career which produced a World Series title, an MVP award, All-Star games and 10,614 plate appearances – all with one team.

    The blunt numbers scream Hall of Famer, but for Chipper Jones – a kid from Pierson, Fla. – it goes far beyond just the raw data. It goes to something etched on a plaque hanging in my Braves Room, a quote that sums up the essence of Jones’ relationship with the team he signed with in 1990, the team I’ve loved since the late 1970s and a team that I covered a bit from time to time during a previous life.

    “I’m a southern kid and I wanted to play in a southern town where I felt comfortable.”

    That comfort level brings much discomfort for opposing fanbases, most notably the one who pledges allegiance to the New York Mets. Chipper made a livelihood out of crushing the Mets, from hitting 49 career homers against the team from Flushing in 245 games to his famous smash job against New York during the 1999 race for the National League East title, in which he belted seven homers while hitting .400 with a 1.510 OPS in 12 games.

    But this story goes beyond the numbers. It goes to a relationship between father and son, the elder imparting wisdom and spinning yarns of heroes of yesteryear, of games watched together, of batting practice and little league and travel ball, of going away to play baseball in high school, of growing up and making mistakes and learning to be a man – lessons we have to learn regardless of athletic prowess or lack thereof.

    For me, it goes to the moments. I saw his first major-league hit – Sept. 14, 1993 against the Reds, in the midst of the last great pennant race, a chopper to third base that Juan Samuel could not field in time to throw out the fleet-footed switch-hitter. I saw his last major-league hit – Oct. 5, 2012 against the Cardinals in the NL wild-card game (a game remembered for the worst officiating call I’ve witnessed in 40 years of attending and covering sporting events), another infield single in his final at-bat as a major-leaguer.

    In between, I was fortunate to be in the building when Chipper celebrated winning two pennants and a World Series championship, was a member of the press asking him about the disappointment of losing the first two World Series games at home in 1999, covered him belting a home run in Atlanta in the 2000 All-Star game, and countless other moments as fan and sports writer that are blurred by the passage of time.

    During that stretch, I grew up, got married, became a dad, changed careers and started coaching baseball. Chipper is one of a select few I always pointed to when players and parents would ask for somebody in the majors for their children to watch and learn how to play the game. He never took a pitch off, wanted to be in the lineup every day, wasn’t afraid to speak his mind, and put his heart and soul into every game in which he took the field.

    Friday night, I sat in SunTrust Park with my oldest son. Jonny Venters, who the Braves acquired from Tampa Bay the night before, made his first appearance with Atlanta since that 2012 wild-card game. When I showed my son a tweet by Kevin McAlpin of 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM stating how long it had been since Venters pitched for the Braves, my son immediately replied: “Chipper’s final game.”

    It was interesting to watch the All-American boy with the good looks and the immense talent grow up before our eyes. Consider the greats of that era of Braves baseball. Glavine was drafted in 1984. Smoltz was traded for in 1987. Neither transaction moved the needle because, to be blunt, the Braves were irrelevant in a town captivated with Hawks basketball (and I loved me some Atlanta’s Air Force back then) and college football and little else, especially a baseball team that finished buried in the old NL West every year from 1985-1990.

    Maddux? Sure, that was a huge move, but it came in the winter following the 1992 season, after the Braves had captured the city’s heart and soul with two consecutive NL pennants. Cox? He managed here from 1978-1981, left for Toronto, then came home to serve as general manager starting in 1986 until he moved back to the dugout in 1990, during the aforementioned awful years. Even Schuerholz, the architect of that worst-to-first 1991 squad, had been here nearly three full seasons before Chipper arrived.

    The point being: Chipper went from start to finish in the midst of one of the greatest runs in American pro sports history, with all eyes on him, with the pressure of a city and a fanbase eager to shake its reputation of being a bad sports town. And Chipper delivered, often in dramatic, “did you see that?!” fashion. Even his last homer, the walkoff blast off Jonathan Papelbon on the Sunday before Labor Day in 2012, still elicits tremendous emotion nearly six years later.

    I started my third year of college as a 20-year-old when I sat in old Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium and watched Chipper leg out an infield single for his first knock in the majors. I sat in Turner Field as a 39-year-old husband and father of two, with my oldest son by my side, when Chipper legged out an infield single in the ninth inning of the 2012 wild-card game in his final at-bat.

    Off the field, Chipper made his share of mistakes. His biography, “Ballplayer,” written by the fantastic former Atlanta Journal-Constitution writer Carroll Rogers Walton – who was more than kind to a young sportswriter trying to find his way once upon a time – is a tremendous tell-all of that side of the guy who went from hot-shot, cocky top prospect to franchise icon.

    And now the journey arrives this weekend in Cooperstown, and enshrinement in the hall of baseball immortals. I’ll spend Sunday in a hotel room next to SunTrust Park at a private watch party before the Braves game with the Dodgers, and I’ll lift a glass in honor of a player who brought this fanbase so much joy for two decades.

    Seventy-eight days after Chipper’s first big-league hit, a song was released that played constantly on radio during my college days. “Mr. Jones” became Counting Crows’ biggest hit, and I think often of this lyric from that song anytime I think about Chipper’s journey:

    “We all wanna be big stars,

    “But we don’t know why, and we don’t know how,

    “But when everybody loves me,

    “I wanna be just about as happy as I can be.”

    Suffice to say, Chipper became one of the biggest stars of all. And it sounds like he’s happy with his life. Any of us who go through life pray for happiness and contentment. That transcends any success we find in our chosen profession. As someone who is in that place, I’m so happy Chipper has found that peace.

    Sunday, in a small village in upstate New York, he will cement his rightful place amid the greatest of the greats. And to think, we’ve been watching this journey for a quarter-century.

    Well done, kid.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Braves Are Fun Again: From Every Angle, Lots of Positives

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – Pardon us for doing a little celebrating on this night, but the Atlanta Braves have won 11 games.

    Eleven wins through April’s third week doth not make a postseason team. For some franchises, it hardly would cause a blink of the eye. But consider this tidbit: we are talking about a franchise that did not win its 11th game last season until May 2.

    Two years ago? Win No. 11 came on May 20.

    Welcome to the early minutes of April 20. The Braves are 11-7 through 18 games, a mere 11.1 percent through the season, but for those of us who predicted this team to finish around .500 – I’m on the record saying 80-82 – Atlanta already is nearly 14 percent there and we still have 10 games left in the opening month of this 2018 campaign.

    Braves Manager Brian Snitker briefs reporters after Thursday's 12-4 win over the Mets.

    Braves Manager Brian Snitker briefs reporters after Thursday’s 12-4 win over the Mets.

    These Braves may not be a playoff team, but this team has been an absolute joy to watch. Aggressive baserunning, good starting pitching, clutch hitting and, yes, some overachieving performance at the plate. And thewunderkid Ronald Acuna Jr. remains in Gwinnett, trying to settle his swing and string together enough hits to warrant a promotion.

    Where to begin with this intriguing bunch? Let’s hit a few topics as we go around the horn following Thursday’s series-opening 12-4 rout of the Mets to kick off a four-game set at SunTrust Park:

    Just Win Series

    We heard the sage Bobby Cox say this mantra over and over again during his second run as Atlanta manager (remember, he managed this team from 1978-81, when individual victories were cause for celebration). The Cox approach was if you win series, that’s a recipe for success.

    The Braves entered Thursday’s four-game series with the Mets having played six series. Four of those series, 11 games, came against playoff teams from last season. Three of those series were played against playoff teams, on the road, in miserable conditions.

    (As an aside, the scheduling by Major League Baseball is awful.)

    Atlanta emerged from that 11-game stretch – one game lost due to weather; another game that should’ve been lost due to weather, a contest the Braves lost – at 6-5. You could argue two of those losses were giveaways, the middle game in Colorado and the final game in Chicago, but on the whole, for a team that’s lost 90-plus games the past three years, it definitely was a strong showing.

    Unsung Heroes

    Every team that overachieves has to have guys who step up and provide that “did he really do that?” moment. The Braves have provided plenty of those through the first 18 games. Consider:

    Braves OF Preston Tucker on Thursday pulled even with Washington's Bryce Harper for the NL lead in RBI (18)

    Braves OF Preston Tucker on Thursday pulled even with Washington’s Bryce Harper for the NL lead in RBI (18)

    ♦  Preston Tucker: He was just a placeholder for Acuna, and yet the former Houston farmhand has 18 RBIs through 18 games after driving in five runs in Thursday’s victory over the Mets. He’s belted a trio of three-run homers, his defense has been better than expected, and he provides left-handed power in the lineup that sorely is needed.

    ♦  Ryan Flaherty: How does this guy keep hitting? He arrived with a great glove to fill in at third base while Johan Camargo rehabbed from an obliqueinjury, but the journeyman Flaherty has established himself for now as a viable piece in the lineup. He’s hitting .352, belted a three-run homer Wednesday against Philly, drew two walks against the Mets (bumping his OPS to .954) while providing the steady defense we expected. The early-season production for Flaherty is not sustainable. Tucker likely is not sustainable, either. But Atlanta is deciding to ride the hot hands for now, starting Flaherty over Camargo and keeping Acuna in Gwinnett while Tucker does his thing.

    ♦  Matt Wisler: When Anibal Sanchez – who himself has bolstered the pitching staff – injured his hamstring the night before he was scheduled to start the series opener against the Mets, the Braves tapped Wisler, one of the “early rebuild” arms who failed to meet expectations. But he brought a renewed confidence and aggressiveness against a Mets team that entered the series opener at 13-4, carving up New York across seven tremendous innings. If nothing else, he earned the right to take the fifth starter’s turn in the rotation Tuesday at Cincinnati. He was that good.

    What About Acuna?

    The 20-year-old, who crushed at every level of the minors last season, then won Arizona Fall League MVP honors last fall, and then dominated the Grapefruit

    OF Ronald Acuna continues to struggle at Triple-A Gwinnett

    OF Ronald Acuna continues to struggle at Triple-A Gwinnett

    League this spring, remains in Triple-A. The main reason? He’s pressing, going 8-for-44 with 17 strikeouts at Gwinnett through his first 11 games. For an organization that sent him down to work on “development” stuff – in other words, to guarantee an extra year of contract control – it would seem odd to promote a .182 hitter and pronounce that development compete.

    Folks, Ronald Acuna is going to be in the majors, and soon. Nobody expected Tucker to perform like he has, and likely didn’t expect Acuna to struggle so far through his first 51 plate appearances at Gwinnett. But the bottom line is once Acuna gets on a roll – and it’s coming – he will be in the majors. There is no worry there. I’d hit that kid cleanup from the get-go once he gets here, but that’s just me.

    Bautista and Bat Flips?

    Young Ronnie has some pretty good bat flips in his arsenal, but Atlanta signed the bat-flip master Jose Bautista to a one-year, minor-league deal on Wednesday. The longtime Toronto slugger, who maintained his relationship with new Braves GM Alex Anthopolous, is at extended spring training, working at third base and looking to prove he can play in the majors.

    I have my doubts. This Bautista is not the guy who finished in the top eight in American League MVP voting four times in six seasons from 2010-15. His on-base percentage has dropped each of the past four seasons, and his slugging percentage has fallen each of the past three seasons. Bautista struck out 170 times a season ago.

    I know some folks want to envision the 2014 Bautista hitting behind Freeman. I don’t see that at all. If he provides a right-handed power bat off the bench, that is a bonus. But I’m not counting on him.

    A Star in the Making

    Is there anybody in the majors today who is more fun to watch than Ozzie Albies? The kid is flat-out awesome to watch, be it diving to snag ground balls, turning double plays, blasting balls into the seats and hitting line drives into the gap.

    Seeing Ozzie round first on his way to an extra-base hit is one of the pure joys of watching baseball today. He plays with so much passion and joy, and he is so fast. His speed and baserunning is game-changing stuff.

    When the All-Star ballot comes out, punch Ozzie’s name at second base, repeatedly. If his production stays anywhere near the level we’ve seen through 18 games – .316 average, .995 OPS, five homers, 11 RBIs, 15 extra-base hits, outstanding defense – he has to be the front-runner for top second baseman in the Senior Circuit.

    What About Julio?

    RHP Julio Teheran

    RHP Julio Teheran

    Teheran has made a big change in his past two starts – relying more on his slider and changeup and mixing in a curveball, as well. In his first two starts of the season, Teheran relied solely on his fastball and opposing lineups pounded the heat, which sat around or just under 90 mph with little movement.

    Maybe Julio has found something with more mixing in of the breaking stuff. I think we all know he’s not an ace, but with four pitches in the mix, JT becomes more effective and more attractive – given his contract status – if Atlanta looks to deal him.

    ***

    It’s just 18 games, but compared to recent history, these Braves in 2018 have pushed the envelope. It’s a fun bunch to watch. There is so far to go but, so far, so good.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Anthopoulos Hiring Restores Hope

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – Alex Anthopoulos may never lead the Atlanta Braves to a World Series championship. But amid a dark and stormy winter, the new general manager of the disgraced franchise provided something during his first day on the job Monday that felt completely unattainable through the first six weeks of the worst offseason in team history.

    Hope.

    Capping a process that accelerated over the weekend and culminated in news breaking in the overnight hours, the 40-year-old sat behind a microphone at SunTrust Park on Monday afternoon, the 12th general manager in Braves history beginning a tenure that starts under immense scrutiny and the looming storm clouds of Major League Baseball’s investigation looming on the horizon.

    Braves Chairman Terry McGuirk introduced new Braves GM Alex Anthopoulos at Sun Trust Park on Monday

    Braves Chairman Terry McGuirk introduced new Braves GM Alex Anthopoulos at Sun Trust Park on Monday

    But even though there undoubtedly will be stiff penalties handed down and time will be needed for the paying public to move beyond the scandal, Anthopoulos and Braves chairman Terry McGuirk sounded all the right notes in Monday’s announcement. And for this organization, getting the optics right is almost as critical in the healing process.

    McGuirk began by apologizing to the Braves fanbase for the front office scandal that forced disgraced former general manager John Coppolella to resign on Oct. 2.  He remained tight lipped about the nature of the misdeeds, revealing only that he expects Major League Baseball to announce the findings of its investigation into the Braves’ rules violations, along with resulting penalties, within the next two weeks.

    As notable as who appeared during the 30-minute press conference was who did not speak. Team president John Hart was not on stage, having been removed of any influence on baseball decisions beyond an advisory role, a necessary move for a baseball lifer who either was guilty of letting Coppolella run amuck, or too disengaged to notice.

    Longtime general manager John Schuerholz was not present on stage, either. Longtime manager Bobby Cox sat in the audience along manager Brian Snitker.

    Let’s now pause to consider this for a moment. Today has to be the first time the Braves made a major announcement without Cox, Schuerholz and/or Hart offering the voice of the franchise since 1985, the season before Cox returned to Atlanta as general manager and a decade before Atlanta won its lone World Series title.

    For a disenchanted fanbase long-since sick of hearing about “The Braves Way,” this was the right move.

    So, too, is hiring Anthopoulos, who made his mark in Toronto as a general manager not afraid to swing and miss in firing on a big deal. There were more hits than misses in building a team that reached the AL championship series in 2015-16, and time spent in the Dodgers’ front office helping bring Los Angeles its first pennant since 1988 certainly helps, too.

    New Braves General Manager Alex Anthopoulos

    New Braves General Manager Alex Anthopoulos

    The fact Atlanta was able to hire Anthopoulos, one of the brighter young minds in baseball with a desire to win, is impressive. Given the current climate surrounding the franchise, it’s nothing short of a best-case scenario. For the fans, bloggers and columnists who have screamed for weeks about cleaning house and steering clear of a list of former GMs closer to retirement than relevance, this is about as good as it gets.

    Certainly, there is risk. Unless the Braves already have an idea what level of sanctions will be passed down, there is that uncertainty looming over whoever landed in the GM’s chair. There clearly are holes on the major-league roster, including the bullpen and third base and the needed move to clear room for Ronald Acuna in the outfield by March.

    But the upside is enormous, which Anthopoulos mentioned repeatedly in his opening address as GM. With baseball’s best farm system and opening revenue streams and a major-league roster already sprinkled with promising young and controllable talent, the national narrative on this day started shifting back to the pre-October storyline.

    The Braves are getting close. The better days are coming, and soon.

    The baseball decisions to come in the next few weeks will loom large for the 2018 season, one in which Atlanta looks to snap a four-season string of 90-plus losses while appeasing fans and business partners who will sting from the scandal and pending sanctions for some time to come. But at least Anthopoulos fills the gaping hole in the front office, consolidating control into a single voice, one that has built a pennant contender, one that was involved in a World Series run last month.

    And that guy holds the keys to the kingdom, one that does not seem as dire as it did before the weekend began. The honeymoon will not last long and he surely will be tasked with trading some of the overpacked pantry of prospects to address immediate needs. But in Anthopoulos the Braves have their man for the next four years.

    Again, they have hope.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    The “Braves Way” Is Dead. Here’s the Path Forward from Scandal

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – Nearly two weeks have elapsed since the house of cards once called the Atlanta Braves front office collapsed, blown away by a chorus of gale-force gusts produced by Major League Baseball’s ongoing investigation into allegations of scandalous behavior.

    We shall not invoke the name of the former general manager who resigned on the opening day of the offseason. I frankly do not care if he ever is heard from again, to be quite honest.

    But at some point, no matter how angry or embarrassed or betrayed or brokenhearted one is, you must look around at the altered landscape and assess the way forward. As the Braves leadership – using that term quite loosely – gathered in Orlando for its annual October organizational meetings, the focus undoubtedly was not so much on the 2018 roster as it was on how to emerge from the worst scandal in franchise history.

    Yes, it’s bad. It quite possibly may get worse once MLB announces its findings and subsequent punishments. No, it won’t set the franchise back a decade. Yes, it may rattle the very foundation that cracked a week ago Monday.

    But keep this in mind: SunTrust Park will be filled to capacity on March 29, 2018, when the Braves open the new season against Philadelphia. Advertisers likely are not leaving. No company with a business in The Battery is going to shut its doors.

    Liberty Media President and CEO Greg Maffei

    Liberty Media President and CEO Greg Maffei

    However, the Braves better be very aware their loyal fanbase – which has gone 22 years since experiencing a World Series title, 18 years without an NL pennant, 16 years with nary a postseason series triumph – looks at its baseball team with a skeptical eye in wake of this mess. Restoring that trust and unwavering support will not happen overnight, but there are a few things whoever is minding the store now and moving forward best keep in mind.

    Accountability

    We see it all the time, whether a public figure commits some sort of transgression or a corporation endures a security breach. Somebody gets behind a microphone, or writes a press release, or posts on social media some canned statement that says little.

    The Braves cannot go down that “blah, blah, blah” road. Somebody, be it John Hart or Terry McGuirk or John Schuerholz, better step up and own this. Pleasant? Nope. Necessary? Absolutely.

    Schuerholz is regarded by some as merely a figurehead driving deals for new stadiums and spring training complexes. Others think the Hall of Famer still is influencing baseball decisions. Hart, as director of the front office who was brought in to mentor the since-deposed GM, reports to McGuirk, the conduit between the faceless Liberty Media conglomerate and the baseball franchise it owns for purposes tax related.

    I have my doubts anybody on Liberty’s board of directors could name more than five players who wore an Atlanta uniform in 2017.

    Regardless, whoever serves as the mouthpiece moving forward better be open and honest. No corporate double-talk. The fans demand (and rightly deserve) to know who knew what, why this happened, what lessons have been learned and what is going to happen moving forward.

    And it better be sincere. If it’s bull, the fanbase will smell it from a mile away.

    Change

    Dumping the brash, somewhat disruptive and downright rude former GM was a no-brainer. Call it a resignation all you want, but the dude had no choice. In essence, he was fired, and he shouldn’t be the first one to pack their office.

    It is inconceivable to me and countless others I have talked to in recent days that this was a back-door, dimly lit, lone-wolf scenario. Those who knew the depth of the alleged transgressions had a moral obligation to speak up, and by not doing so, there must be payment.

    That payment amounts to taking a broom to the executive offices at SunTrust Park. Hart very well may view himself as a bridge to 2018. Schuerholz may fancy himself with a relevant role in the clean-up. McGuirk, who has not uttered a peep since the scandal broke, might feel far enough removed above the fray.

    Atlanta Braves Chairman and CEO Terry McGuirk

    Atlanta Braves Chairman and CEO Terry McGuirk

    Wrong, wrong and wrong. All three must go; if not now, certainly before spring training starts. If there ever was time to cut the cord from two decades ago, now is that time. Yes, that includes Bobby Cox, whose influence (along with Schuerholz) likely has played too much of a role in recent years, resumes and job titles be darned.

    And while we’re at it, once and for all, “The Braves Way” is dead and gone, never to be uttered again. It is worn out and rings hollower today than ever before.

    Contend

    This is easier said than done because, duh, every one of the 30 teams in baseball sets out to compete for a playoff spot each season. But arguably no team on the planet, in any league, at any level of the sport, needs a good 2018 season more than the Braves.

    Forty-eight months ago, Craig Kimbrel stood locked in the bullpen at Dodger Stadium as Los Angeles rallied for a victory that eliminated Atlanta from the NL Division Series. The great tear-down began a few months later, with the late years of this decade the target to return to the limelight with a team bolstered by young starts and a farm system plentiful in top prospects.

    There is no doubt the spotlight shines brightly on this franchise today, but for all the wrong reasons. Within that white-hot glow of scrutiny and skepticism, it may be easy to forget the Braves do have the best farm system in the majors, with several young players either already having ascended to the big leagues or sitting a year or two away.

    The right moves this offseason could accelerate the timeline to contention. That would not be a bad thing given how the Braves have screwed up the one thing that figured never to be shaken – its relationship with an adoring, loyal, generational fanbase that has waited patiently and trusted the process.

    That trust, that patience, is in scant supply these days. Even a run at a wildcard berth that carries beyond Labor Day would be a needed salve on the festering wound this scandal has left.

    The path forward may not be easy, but spare me the tears. The Braves deserve whatever punishment comes from this. The real question in my mind is how does the organization move forward.

    And you better believe we are watching. Closely.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.

    Braves begin offseason amidst change

    On August 1st, the Braves were 6 games over .500 and had lost in spectacular fashion to the offense-challenged San Diego Padres on a night that the team once again trotted out the struggling Mike Minor amid the worry that his downhill slide could be costly to Atlanta down the stretch. As it would turn out, Mike Minor was only one part of the behemoth that kept the Braves out of the playoff and began a huge shakeup in their front office.

    Since September 22nd when the Braves announced quite suddenly that they had fired general manager Frank Wren, they have made several additional moves.

    Hitting coach Greg Walker resigned after three seasons with the club. Given how poorly the bats performed this season, especially the bats of high-potential players Jason Heyward, Chris Johnson, Justin Upton and the high-contract players B.J. Upton and Dan Uggla, the resignation of Walker wasn’t nearly as surprising as the departure of Wren. In addition to Walker leaving the coaching staff, the Braves hired recent Astros manager Bo Porter to be the third base coach under returning manager Fredi Gonzalez. His duties will include working with the outfielders and serving as base running coach. Porter served on the coaching staff of Gonzalez during his time with the Marlins. Gonzalez has been assured of his return in 2015, backed by his predecessor and mentor Bobby Cox.

    With John Hart as the interim GM while a search for Wren’s replacement continues, the Braves have shuffled the front office beginning with the hiring of the former renowned Yankees scout Gordon Blakely. Blakely will serve under the yet to be found GM as the special assistant to the GM.

    Blakeley and assistant GM John Coppolella have a history together going back to their days together with the Yankees. Blakely has a strong track record of successful international signings including now-Mariners’ slugger Robinson Cano.

    All of this change has certainly fed speculation about two potential candidates for open jobs within the organization: Dayton Moore and Chipper Jones.

    Dayton Moore, currently the GM of the ALCS-bound Royals, began his career with the Braves as a scout. He went on to be Atlanta’s assistant director of scouting, assistant director of player development, director of international scouting, director of player personnel development and eventual assistant GM. He left the Braves organization in 2006 when he was offered the GM gig in Kansas City. His contract with the Royals will expire this year.

    Chipper Jones, of course, hasn’t been gone long from the club. Since his retirement in 2012, Jones has been around the club during spring training and throughout the season. He has worked with B.J. Upton on his swing and has been willing to offer advice to his former teammates. However, now may not be the time for Chipper to return to the club as hitting coach. Despite his credentials, he seems to be set on continuing to raise his sons and take over his family’s ranch in Texas. If he were interested, he certainly would be an attractive candidate to the club and a respected voice by the players.

    Until decisions are made for the open positions and, honestly, the postseason concludes, the rumors will continue to fly about the future of the Braves. There are times when an organization needs change and as the team begins building for the big debut of their Cobb County stadium now seems to be the right time.

    Tara Rowe is an independent historian and beat writer for BravesWire.com. Follow Tara on Twitter @framethepitch.

    Carlos Zambrano, the Atlanta Braves, and a lesson in class

    By Jonathan Michael Knott

    Friday night’s contest against the Chicago Cubs at Turner Field featured some behavior rarely seen on a baseball diamond and almost NEVER involving the Braves.  Cubs starting pitcher, Carlos Zambrano, lost his cool after surrendering 5 homeruns to Atlanta hitters. This came as no surprise, as Zambrano has become well known for his short fuse and the kind of temper tantrums that usually result in after-school detention or the confiscation of one’s favorite toy.

    This time, however, it was worse than usual. When Cubs Manager, Mike Quade, opted not to remove Zambrano from the game during his 5th inning shellacking, Zambrano decided to remove himself. He attempted twice, quite transparently, to plunk Chipper Jones with a fastball. It seems clear in retrospect that he grew tired of being lit up like a Christmas tree and was trying to get himself tossed by the home plate umpire, Tim Timmons. And, of course, he was successful.

    His antics would have been shameful in any setting, but the time and place in which they occurred created a striking contrast.  It wasn’t just any Friday night game. The #6 jersey of legendary manager, Bobby Cox, was retired before the game that evening, after he was inducted into the Braves Hall of Fame during a ceremony earlier that day.

    Legendary former Braves manager, Bobby Cox

    What made Cox such a remarkable manager was his unique ability to maintain an even keeled clubhouse over the course of 162 games.  The 14 straight NL East division pennants hung at “The Ted” during his tenure (a feat unparalleled in all of professional sports) are a direct testament to his leadership.  He never allowed emotions to run too high after a win or too low after a loss. Nor would he allow any of his players to wallow in self-pity after an error or during a slump. He had a way of helping each player to believe in himself. His players loved him for it and felt compelled to reward his patience and confidence on the field.

    Bobby was an encourager, and he was quick to forgive honest mistakes. One thing he did NOT tolerate, however, was slack effort or selfish behavior.  To exhibit such behavior was to punch your own ticket out of Atlanta, regardless of your talent level (Yunel Escobar being the most recent example).

    Which brings us back to Zambrano.  Again, the man has been known to make a fool of himself from time to time.  He was even ordered to take anger management classes for several months last year after erupting at Derrek Lee—widely considered one of the most amiable men in baseball—in the Cubs dugout.  But on Friday night in Atlanta, he outdid himself.  As Braves hitters knocked Zambrano around like oversized piñata, you could see in his eyes that he was inching ever closer to boiling point.

    When Dan Uggla connected for his second homer of the evening (the team’s fifth), Zambrano decided he was finished. After he took aim at Chipper with two intentional would-be beanballs, which Chipper narrowly avoided, Tim Timmons unhesitatingly ejected Zambrano.  Timmons then marched toward the Braves dugout yelling and gesticulating like an angry drill Sergeant, warning Braves players not to rush the mound.  This proved to be wise, as Jason Heyward (6-5, 250 lbs), Freddie Freeman (6-5, 240) and Eric Hinske (6-4, 260) had already charged out of the dugout, and had they been allowed to get up a head of steam it would have been like the running of the bulls at Pomplona.

    It’s a shame, really, that Timmons got in the way. It would have been fascinating to see how motivated Zambrano’s teammates, for whom he’s show such frequent disregard, would have been to rush to his aid and jump between him and the Braves’ linebacker-sized sluggers.

    Chicago Cubs starting pitcher, Carlos Zambrano

    But perhaps Zambrano didn’t notice the angry men with the professional wrestler physiques headed his way, because he didn’t seem concerned.  He just strolled calmly off the field. He paused in the dugout for just a moment, cracked a grin and yelled something incoherent at a TV cameraman, who tried not to notice.  He then made his way to the visitors’ clubhouse, cleaned out his locker and told the clubhouse staff he was retiring.

    This incident was different from his previous meltdowns. In an odd way, it was much worse. This time, the Gatorade coolers had nothing to fear. He didn’t clean out the bat rack, curse at his teammates or take out his frustration on any inanimate object within walking distance. This time, he didn’t get angry. Nope… he simply gave up and quit.

    First, he quit the game by deliberately throwing at Chipper for the express purpose of getting himself ejected. And then he quit the team when he cleared out his locker and left the ballpark while the game was still in progress.

    I’m pretty sure the Encarta North-American dictionary now has a new definition for “horse’s ass”.

    That kind of behavior sticks out like a sore grotesquely disfigured thumb anywhere, anytime. But at Turner Field, on a night set aside honor one of the all-time classiest managers of one of the classiest organizations in baseball… that’s a whole new level of irony.

    Cubs General Manager, Jim Hendry, later phoned Braves GM, Frank Wren, to offer a well received apology on behalf of his team. And Zambrano has since been placed on the 30-day disqualified list, which means he’ll have no contact with the team and will not be paid for 30 days.  I have no doubt whatsoever that Cubs management was as mortified as anyone in baseball by Zambrano’s behavior. But be that as it may, this wouldn’t have happened in Atlanta. Well, ok… it DID happen in Atlanta, but you know what I mean.

    This wouldn’t have happened under Bobby or his successor, Fredi Gonzalez.  Bobby was a longsuffering manager who forgave mistakes, but he did not suffer fools.  Fredi was hired as the person most likely to seamlessly carry on that tradition.

    Had Zambrano pitched for the Braves, he would have learned to control himself… or he’d have been shipped long ago to the American League for a tub of sunflower seeds and a player to be named later.  That’s just the way the way the Braves do business. The right way.

    The stark contrast between the idiocy of Carlos Zambrano and the professionalism of the Braves reminds us all what a classy organization this really is.

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    Jersey retirement one more chance for fans to say ‘Thanks, Bobby’

    By Bud L. Ellis

    ATLANTA – They filled every nook and cranny of the ballyard that once upon a time was merely a paved patch of smartly lined parking spaces.

    Old. Young. Many who have never known, until this April, an Atlanta Braves team not managed by one Robert Joseph Cox. And some who may actually recall a soon-to-be 37-year-old managing the Braves to a 13-4 loss against Los Angeles on April 10, 1978, his first game as a major-league skipper.

    How fitting that the Dodgers’ winning pitcher that opening day so long ago, one Don Sutton, would stand behind the mic Friday evening on a temporary stage in the infield at Turner Field, that former parking lot that now calls itself the home of the Braves. And the man they turned out to honor indeed has changed in the past 33 years.

    Legendary former Braves manager, Bobby Cox

    More importantly, a baseball franchise and a city has evolved in that 1/3rd of a century, directly due to the guiding hand and fierce will to win of Bobby Cox, whose No. 6 took its rightful place high above the left-field seats, retired forever more. Friday’s jersey retirement ceremony gave a grateful franchise and an appreciative city one more chance to say “Thanks Bobby.”

    And in true Bobby Cox form, he deflected the accolades cast upon him by friends, family, former players and more than 50,000 fans. He started his thank-you speech by nodding toward Fredi Gonzalez, the first Braves’ manager not named Bobby Cox since Russ Nixon was relieved of his duties in June 1990, a move that brought Cox out of the general manager’s seat and back to his rightful place:

    The dugout.

    It would be Cox’s second tour of duty at the helm, his first a rough four-year stretch from 1978-1981 that resulted in three sub-.500 seasons. But Cox laid the foundation for a team that in 1982 under another young manager (some fella named Joe Torre) took baseball by storm, winning its first 13 games of the season and capturing the NL West Division title, just the Braves’ second postseason berth since fleeing Milwaukee for the Peach State in 1966.

    Brought back to the Braves as general manager after four solid years as manager in Toronto – capped by 99 victories and an AL East title in 1985 – Cox oversaw what would turn out to be a transformation of a struggling franchise into a model that became the envy of all of baseball. “The Braves Way” was to play the game hard, win with class and lose with dignity, and always put forth an effort that made a franchise and its fanbase proud.

    Thirty-three years ago, Bobby Cox managed a 97-loss team playing in a mostly empty stadium. Friday night, in a place that once sat as a mostly empty parking lot, Bobby Cox stood and received the ultimate honor a franchise can bestowe upon one of its own.

    —30—

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