• Exclusives

    FREE IN 13! Braves Outlast Reds in Classic Game 1, Sit One Win from NLDS

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – Pardon me if it takes a minute to gather my thoughts. I’ve been watching and writing about the teams from here for a long time.

    So take it from me: Atlanta teams aren’t accustomed to winning this type of game.

    Certainly not in the postseason.

    Yet there the Braves were Wednesday, four hours and 39 minutes into a tight, tense scoreless fight with Cincinnati in Game 1 of the National League Wild Card series at Truist Park. At some point, the urgency of jumping to a lead in the rapid-fire best-of-three series with two rookies slated to start the next two days faded into a blur of strikeouts, history, stranded runners until, finally, a soft single to center from the probable NL most valuable player ended the stalemate.

    Freddie Freeman flicked a 1-2 pitch from Amir Garrett over the second base bag, chasing home top prospect and pinch runner Cristian Pache to give the Braves a 1-0 victory in 13 agonizing, nerve-jangling, life-shortening innings. What happened between Max Fried’s first pitch at 12:08 p.m. ET and Pache becoming the first – and only – player to touch home plate on this day was thrilling.

    And torturous. At some point, I imagine even the most loyal Braves fan looked skyward and said out loud, “in what macabre way will we lose this one?”

    Not on this day, though! For once, a team based in Georgia’s capital city managed to avoid the type of crushing, soul-stealing heartbreak that fans in this part of the world not only expect, but accept as a birthright. Like closing school for one inch of snow, sweet tea at every restaurant, and a non-stop countdown to the start of SEC football, devastating postseason losses are our thing. Just ask the Hawks, the Bulldogs, and of course, the Falcons.

    But not on this day. And how the Braves managed to reach sundown with two shots to win a playoff series for the first time in 19 years is a story that will be told for a long, long time. Asked to try and put the series opener into some semblance of perspective, Atlanta manager Brian Snitker chucked.

    “I don’t know if we’ve got enough time,” he told reporters.

    Captain Clutch: Freddie Freeman delivered the RBI single in the 13th inning that lifted the Braves to a 1-0 victory over Cincinnati and a 1-0 lead in the NL Wild Card series Wednesday.

    Just consider the first glance at the box score: 12 ½ scoreless innings, the longest 0-0 contest in MLB postseason history. The two teams combined for 37 strikeouts, another playoff record. The mere fact the Atlanta offense, which led the majors in OBP this season, whiffed 21 times and still won the game is mind blowing. The Braves finished with all of six hits, three coming in a 13th inning that turned up lucky for Atlanta at long last.

    Honestly, the Reds weren’t much better offensively despite recording 11 hits. Cincinnati hitters struck out 16 times, and finished 1-for-12 with runners in scoring position with 13 left on base. Time and time again, the Reds put pressure on the Braves bullpen, a relief corps completely remade in the past 14 months.

    Consider this for a moment: the closer on July 30, 2019 was Luke Jackson. Wednesday, he was left off the playoff roster.

    Snitker gets plenty of criticism (some of it well deserved) for bullpen management, but he made all the right moves in Game 1. The guys he called upon responded, even if they walked a tightrope to get to the other side of the canyon. Darren O’Day gave up a double and issued two walks in the 11th. Tyler Matzek kept it scoreless, striking out Mike Moustakas to end the threat, then whiffed the side in the 12th after allowing consecutive singles.

    In the 13th, Shane Greene gave up two singles and threw a wild pitch. A.J. Minter came on and walked Moustakas to load the bases before a strikeout and groundout got the Braves out of trouble again. Somehow, someway, the bullpen avoided the wrong steps that so often have plagued this franchise in postseasons past.

    As the strikeouts in the scorebook and zeros on the scoreboard piled up, it became easy to forget the two pitchers who set us down this path. Cincinnati starter Trevor Bauer backed up his big talk with a command performance, striking out 12 with no walks and two hits allowed in 7 2/3 innings. The Braves handed the ball to Fried for his first postseason start – I mean, who else was going to start the opener – and the lefty responded with five strikeouts and no walks in seven shutout frames.

    Fried found himself in a jam right off the bat as Cincinnati opened the game with back-to-back singles. But as soon as Braves fans immediately started recoiling at the thought of another awful opening inning in a home playoff game, the 26-year-old induced two groundouts and a flyout to set the tone. Fried threw 53 of his 78 pitches for strikes across seven innings – one more than he pitched the final three weeks of the regular season – then sat back and watched the madness unfold like the rest of us.

    Pair of Aces: Cincinnati’s Trevor Bauer and Atlanta’s Max Fried put on a show in Game 1 of the NL Wild Card series Wednesday.

    “It was so much fun to watch,” Fried told reporters postgame.

    It was a demoralizing loss for the Reds, but don’t expect any Atlanta fan to gloat too soon. There’s at least one, and perhaps two, games left to play in this series. But Game 2 and (if needed) Game 3 will have a hard time living up to the opener.

    It was the type of game Atlanta teams just don’t win.

    It was a game the Braves won anyway.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.