• Exclusives

    Braves part ways with Uggla, welcome back Gattis from DL

    It was only a matter of time before the Atlanta Braves could no longer afford to play with a 24-man roster due to the abject failure of Dan Uggla. While Frank Wren had shopped Uggla to numerous teams in the month prior to the all-star break, no teams were willing to trade with the Braves for a second baseman who seems to have lost what once made him a formidable bat in the National League.

    The Braves were not only facing a continued short bench, a 24-man roster, if you will, they were facing the possibility that if the Braves didn’t find a trade partner for Uggla, they would eat a large chunk of money. Unfortunately for the Braves, the lack of trade partner will cost them the remainder of Uggla’s $13 million salary for 2014 as well as the $13 million he is owed for 2015.

    Think back to July of 2010 when the Braves learned that utility man Omar Infante had been selected to the All Star Game. It was a highly unusual selection by Charlie Manuel and much talked about. Infante was a sure hand in the field, filling in for the veteran Chipper Jones and stepping up at second base. His bat, of course, was a huge part of his value. Infante finished the 2010 campaign with a .321 batting average with 15 doubles, 3 triples, 8 homers and 47 RBIs in 134 games. It was Infante’s finest season and upped his value considerably. It wasn’t surprising that when power-hitting Dan Uggla was available, the Braves pounced on the chance to trade with the Marlins to bring Uggla to Atlanta for Infante. But like so many trades have in over the long history of baseball, it turned out to be a bust for Atlanta.

    While Infante continued to put up respectable numbers as the everyday second baseman for the Marlins before being traded to the Detroit Tigers, Dan Uggla’s numbers have been headache-inducing for the Braves’ front office, coaching staff and fan base. Like Infante, 2010 was Dan Uggla’s strongest year. He put together a .287 average with 33 homers and 105 RBIs (average and RBIs were a career high). His value was highest when he joined the Braves. From there it spiraled downward. In his first season with Atlanta he posted a .233 average with a career high 36 homers. His bulked up frame seemed to hurt his overall ability at the plate, but his defense remained solid. As his batting average plummeted (.220 in 2012, .179 in 2013, .162 in 2014), his defense alone couldn’t continue to secure him a spot in the lineup. In 2014, we’ve seen the Braves cut Uggla’s playing time and call up rookie La Stella.

    Uggla was released by the Braves on Monday and this morning the latest on Dan was that the Giants had signed him to a minor league contract. He’ll join their Triple A affiliate in Fresno. He has an August 1st opt-out clause if he isn’t called up to the big league club, a club really hurting for a younger, healthier second baseman. If he makes it to the big leagues, the Giants will be responsible for the league minimum salary while the Braves continue to be on the hook for his 2014 contract salary.

    Nobody wanted to see Dan Uggla fail, including Dan Uggla himself. He handled the situation as best he could and was always respectful to the club and its fans. This is how the game of baseball works–good or bad. There is no denying that Dan Uggla had some amazing games for the Braves. While he struggled mightily with the team, let’s not forget that he also had some amazing runs. When Dan Uggla’s bat was hot, there was nobody more feared by pitchers. It was a pleasure watching Uggla step to the plate to face dominant pitchers like Strasburg and leave them in awe and frustration. Let’s choose to remember those times and wish Uggla well.

    THE RETURN OF EL OSO BLANCO…

    Evan Gattis was hitting .290 before landing on the disabled list at the end of June.

    Evan Gattis was hitting .290 before landing on the disabled list at the end of June.

    In all the all-star talk about Julio Teheran, Freddie Freeman, Craig Kimbrel and Justin Upton, the first half of Evan Gattis mostly was forgotten. His rhomboid injury, eventually learned to be a bulging disc, put an end to an incredible run for Gattis. When he landed on the disabled list, he was hitting .290 with 16 homers and 39 RBIs. His at-bats were electric and powered the Braves back from the brink in many games. His clutch hits are renowned in the league in this his second season. But even the 6’4″ Gattis is not invincible.

    After a long stint on the DL, Gattis is back for Monday night’s game. His Triple-A rehab assignment went without incident and he has been cleared to both hit and call the game behind the plate.

    With Gattis returning, it goes without saying that the Braves have to evaluate how they want to proceed. In the absence of Gattis, veteran Gerald Laird stepped up not only behind the plate, but as a leader and mentor for young Christian Bethancourt. Bethancourt has hit .240 in 13 games since being called up. Coincidentally, Gerald Laird is also hitting .240 on the season.

    Fredi Gonzalez can certainly say that the kids are alright. With Bethancourt proving he can call games behind the plate and get hits, his time in the minor leagues may be limited going forward. Additionally, Tommy La Stella has been a gift from the baseball gods. Since being called up at the end of May, La Stella is hitting .297 with 11 doubles and 21 RBIs in 165 at-bats. His defense is proving better than advertised and the Braves are no longer sending Ramiro Pena in as a defensive replacement late in games due to La Stella’s clutch hitting. That La Stella has been such a marvel to watch on the field has taken some of the sting out of the failure of Dan Uggla.

    One other young gun worth noting is Shae Simmons. Simmons recently broke a 2-year streak of not having given up a homer. Since joining the ‘pen on the last day of May, Simmons has put together a 1-1 record with 8 holds, a 2.18 ERA and 22 strikeouts in 20 2/3 innings. With the bad run of David Carpenter and the floundering Luis Avilan who has been demoted to Gwinnett, the dominance of Shae Simmons has been much needed in Atlanta’s ‘pen. Simmons, like Bethancourt and La Stella, seems to have a bright future ahead.

    With Gattis back in the lineup, the Braves get underway tonight against the Miami Marlins. Monday night’s game will feature Koehler (6-7, 3.99) vs. Teheran (9-6, 2.71). Tuesday night will pit Turner (2-6, 6.22) vs. Minor (3-5, 4.86). Wednesday’s game will send out Eovaldi (5-5, 4.08) vs. Santana (8-6, 4.03). And the series finale will see Harang (9-6, 3.36) take the mound against an unnamed starter for Miami who definitely isn’t Jose Fernandez.

    Tara Rowe is an independent historian and beat writer for BravesWire.com. Follow Tara on Twitter @framethepitch.