• Exclusives

    Braves at the Trade Deadline … Do They Have a Dance Partner?

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA — In the spring of 1986, the Atlanta Hawks were on their way to another playoff exit, the Atlanta Braves were on their way to another losing season, and I was on my way to the bustling metropolis of Macon, Ga., for the state junior beta convention.

    The final night of the convention ended with a dance. I spent the majority of the evening tugging uncomfortably at my tie, filling up on snack food and talking sports with a group of fellow awkward teenagers, including a girl from my school with whom I was friends.

    When the night’s final song cued up, she grabbed my hand, led me on the dance floor and we slow danced. I never asked her why, I don’t remember the song, I certainly didn’t kiss her (I think I was paralyzed with shock) and I don’t think either one of us spoke of the incident again. The only thing I could figure in the days and weeks that followed is she really wanted to dance with somebody, she seized the moment, and I was present at the right place at the right time.

    Welcome to baseball’s Trade Deadline, the time of year where the pressure of finding that right piece of a pennant-winning puzzle – or the opportunity to shed veteran payroll and snag future talent to accelerate a rebuild – brings together general managers and scouting directors, while 30 fanbases simultaneously salivate and shiver.

    Braves General Manager John Coppolella

    Braves General Manager John Coppolella

    And tweet. Lord have mercy, do they ever.

    The deadline arrives at 4 p.m. Monday and, with all apologizes to science fans anxiously counting down to the solar eclipse three weeks from now, this is the world-altering, awe-inspiring Monday on the calendar. It is circled on the calendar of every GM – real, wannabe or armchair – from coast to coast.

    My Twitter feed in recent days has been fueled by almost every form of speculation possible, from the Braves acquiring a controllable ace that would vault Atlanta from the outside of the wild-card race squarely into the hunt for the World Series (or at least that’s the logic applied) to the queries of whether Player X could be dealt, even though Player X probably wouldn’t net more than a six-pack of Natty Light, a stale pretzel and a leftover ham sandwich.

    (My apologizes to ham sandwich lovers everywhere. Cheese and mayo on toasted bread, please).

    Look, here’s the truth of the matter: The Braves have lost seven of their past eight games. The latest in a series of hellish road trips that has dotted the schedule finally appears to have torpedoed any fleeting glimpse of contending in the season’s final two months. Even a .500 finish seems tentative at this point, but remember January and February and ask yourself if you’d be happy sitting at break-even on the evening of Oct. 1 (don’t lie; you’d be thrilled).

    It is a time of contrasting emotions. I get it. You love Brandon Phillips, the ATLien whose infectious smile and resurgent season has caused many of us to fall in love with the pride of Redan High. You are thrilled the Braves rescued Matt Adams from the end of the Cardinals’ bench when Freddie Freeman got hurt, and Adams responded by turning the right-field seats at SunTrust Park into his own driving range.

    But now that Freeman’s back and Johan Camargo has emerged with a breakout season – so much so, Dansby Swanson is clean shaven and manning shortstop for Gwinnett – you want to see Phillips and Adams moved. You want Freeman, who honesty compels me to say has looked better than expected at third base, back at his natural position. You want Swanson promoted and back at shortstop as soon as he can string a couple of hits together for the G-Braves (who will be the Buttons or Sweet Teas or heaven knows what next season).

    You want Ozzie Albies, who cannot legally buy alcohol but has raked Triple-A pitching, manning second base in the Northwest Atlanta suburbs and not the Northeast burbs. And with every at-bat he gets at Triple-A, 19-year-old phenom Ronald Acuna draws louder comparisons to Andruw Jones, whose 1996 season started in the low minors and ended with a World Series debut for the ages.

    Braves knuckleballer R.A. Dickey appears to be staying put at the deadline

    Knuckle-baller R.A. Dickey appears to be staying put at the non-waiver trade deadline

    I get it. I feel ya. There’s just one problem.

    There is precious little demand for Adams, who only can play first base and who has cooled off somewhat since his white-hot start. There is not a market for Phillips, a veteran who has played only nine postseason games in his 16-year career and is a free agent come October. Whatever market for closer Jim Johnson, he of the back-to-back 50-save seasons in 2012-13 but he with the eight blown saves in 2017 and the $5 million price tag for 2018, has evaporated quicker than the hottest of hot takes burning up social media.

    R.A. Dickey? He’s a 42-year-old knuckleballer with an $8 million team option for next season and, to be frank, likely should be given a chance to make the Braves’ roster in 2018 given the way he’s pitched the past two months. Nick Markakis, who mans the position we all expect Acuna to take come April (or September, or yesterday)? That’s $11 million for next season for a singles/doubles hitter with limited power.

    Much like that cute gal who led me onto the dance floor so many years ago, you need a partner who wants to dance. You can offer the grandest of all packages, but if the other side says no, there is no deal.

    So for all the folks with the patience of a gnat and the buildup of angst from a bad week of baseball, I say this: relax.

    Yes, 4 p.m. Monday will come and go, and the world will keep spinning. The Braves will be wrapping up their road trip when the deadline passes. No matter what does or does not happen, they will fly back to Atlanta Monday evening and hit the field for Tuesday’s game with the Dodgers.

    Maybe John Coppolella walks across the floor and takes somebody’s unsuspecting hand in the hours leading up to the deadline. You know, I know, we all know he’s trying, looking to uncover every possibility and explore every scenario. The feeling here says nothing major happens, that for Braves County the deadline will pass uneventfully.

    But at the same time, I had no idea I’d be on that dance floor so many years ago.

    —30—

     

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.