• Exclusives

    AS EASY AS M-V-FREE! Braves First Baseman Caps Brilliant Season with Atlanta’s First MVP Honor Since 1999

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    SOMEWHERE IN NORTH GEORGIA – Many things come to mind when you mention the names Dale Murphy, Terry Pendleton and Chipper Jones. My first thought is how each was emblematic of the Atlanta Braves while wearing the uniform.

    Murphy, the kid from Oregon with the All-American boyish looks who became a star as the Braves won fans from coast-to-coast on the Superstation en route to the 1982 NL West title. Pendleton, the fiery sparkplug from Los Angeles who helped whip the youthful Braves into winners during the magical 1991 worst-to-first season. Jones, the boy from Florida possessing equal parts Southern cockiness and charm who anchored the franchise among baseball’s elite for most of two decades.

    A trio of Atlanta Braves, each a NL MVP award winner. Their exclusive club grew by one Thursday evening, and how fitting that they were joined by one who also is a symbol of the franchise.

    Freddie Freeman becomes the fourth Brave to win the honor since the franchise moved to Atlanta, the first since Jones in 1999 and joining Pendleton (1991) and Murphy (1982-83). His 2020 goes far beyond just the sparkly numbers compiled across the truncated 60-game regular season – the 1.102 OPS, the .341/.462/.640 slash line, the first two grand slams of his career.

    It transcends his postseason performance – the 13th-inning walkoff single against the Reds in Game 1 of the wild card series, the two homers against the Dodgers in the NLCS (a third robbed by MVP finalist Mookie Betts in Game 7 may have kept the Braves from reaching the World Series), the .903 OPS.

    It’s a season that wasn’t guaranteed given Freeman’s COVID-19 diagnosis, the news breaking on the Fourth of July as summer camp began at Truist Park. We all know the story of Freeman running a 104.5 degree fever, a husband and a father of a 3-year-old with twins on the way pondering his fate far beyond the diamond. And yet, 20 days later, there Freeman was, taking his hacks against his buddy Jacob deGrom on opening day at Citi Field.

    That’s the Freeman way. He’s always there. He was there as a rookie in 2010, belting his first big-league homer off Hall of Famer Roy Halladay in Hall of Famer Bobby Cox’s final days as manager. He was there in 2011, squatting behind the first-base bag after grounding into a season-ending double-play in the 13th inning of Game 162. He was there in 2012, homering against the Marlins to send Atlanta to the playoffs, Jones standing famously on third base with his right arm raised in triumph.

    Ten days later, the Braves season and Jones career ended.

    It’s been Freeman’s team ever since. Partly because of his brilliance – four top-10 finishes in MVP voting from 2012-19, five seasons hitting above .300, four All-Star appearances. Partly because he was the only position player to survive the Braves rebuild – as the franchise stripped it down to the studs, Freeman remained, a pillar around which Atlanta now has built a World Series championship contender.

    Now he joins that aforementioned trio of Braves royalty, linked not just by the MVP trophy, but by time. Murphy, traded to Philadelphia mere months before Pendleton signed as a free agent. Pendleton, who consoled Jones the night the rookie blew out his knee in spring training in 1994. Jones, sliding into the sunset after 2012 as Freeman began his ascension toward baseball stardom.

    That rise now includes the MVP trophy, and membership in an exclusive club of Braves legends.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.