• Exclusives

    Acuna’s Unbelievable Surge Fueling the Surging Braves

    By Bud L. Ellis

    BravesWire.com

    ATLANTA – Late Tuesday night, my cell phone buzzed. It was a text from my best friend, who I met on the first day of sixth grade way back in 1984 in the cafeteria at Chapel Hill Middle in Douglasville, Ga. We’ve shared the highest of highs and lowest of lows when it comes to Atlanta sports for nearly 3 ½ decades since.

    On this night, he sent me a text that simply sums up where all of us reside when we try to describe what one Ronald Acuna has unleashed of late:

    “Amazing doesn’t begin to describe it.”

    I responded with “it’s otherworldly,” and yet, even that seems not enough to encapsulate what Acuna has done the past few days.

    Before I try to capture what the 20-year-old phenom has delivered in the midst of this pennant race – one that finds the Braves waking up on Wednesday with a two-game lead, at 16 games above .500 for the first time since 2013 – let’s get the stats out of the way. They’re video-game numbers, but we’ve watched them unfold before our very eyes in recent days:

    Acuna homered as the leadoff hitter in the bottom of the first inning for the third consecutive game Tuesday, and in four of the past five games. In the game he didn’t homer in the first inning, he drew a walk, only to homer in his next at-bat. He’s homered in his first official at-bat in the past five games, the first player to do so since a 23-year-old outfielder accomplished that feat for the New York Giants in 1954.

    Maybe you’ve heard of him. Some dude named Willie Mays.

    Starting with the first game after the All-Star break Acuna, who has been in the leadoff spot, is hitting .358 in 24 games with 11 homers, 24 RBIs and 25 runs scored. He has homered in five consecutive games, in seven of the past eight games. He brings an eight-game hitting streak into Wednesday, batting .485 in that stretch with 13 runs scored.

    If the Braves cap this storybook run with a division title, moving Acuna to the leadoff spot may be the biggest reason why this team reaches the postseason for the first time in five seasons.

    Now to the hard part of this piece, which is trying to frame what Acuna has done on the biggest stage of all in recent days. As someone who has watched baseball for 40 years, from the majors down to the grass-roots level, as someone who always has the right words and the right perspective, I can’t provide you anything definitive.

    That’s because this kid – who is not old enough to buy a drink, who two years ago was playing in Single-A – is doing something that even in high school would turn heads. But in the majors? For a first-place team battling for a playoff spot? In 99 percent of cases, kids who smash in the minors get exposed. There is no way they can be this good at the major-league level.

    And yet, here is Acuna, smashing baseballs (I’d venture to argue that his line-drive single up the middle in the fourth inning Tuesday was his most impressive swing of the night) all over the yard, helping push the Braves to heights none of us dared to dream in March this team could achieve.

    Beyond the raw talent – and many of us think he will become a top-10 player in the majors sooner rather than later – is his raw emotion and love for the game, and his team. He flips bats. He hugs teammates. When Charlie Culberson followed Acuna’s leadoff blast with a homer of his own Tuesday, Acuna was jumping in the dugout. He’s a kid who doesn’t hesitate to let his emotions show, a welcomed sign for a franchise that has been too buttoned-up for far too long.

    Acuna has seven multi-hit performances in 14 August appearances, impressive in its own right, but all the more so considering his team has won 13 of its past 17 games to surge to the top of the division. He has drove home at least one run and scored one run in six of his past eight games. At the time where the pretenders are separated from the contenders amid the dog days of August, one could argue Acuna has not only kept the Braves in the race, but has energized his team at one of the most important junctures of this season.

    He destroyed opposing pitching in spring training, and yes, he was facing some front-line guys because Atlanta gave him starts and at-bats early in Grapefruit League action. He recovered from a knee injury in Boston the final weekend in May. Even with June lost while he recovered, even with Washington’s Juan Soto blazing his own trail at age 19, Acuna has thrust himself squarely into the race for rookie of the year.

    Despite the Nationals falling eight games behind Atlanta in the NL East race, and a crowded field to jump just for wild-card consideration, it may be national belief the uber-talented Washington outfielder deserves the rookie of the year since he’s the youngest player in the majors. And that’s OK.

    Why? Rewind the clock 23 years to 1995. So many people felt Chipper Jones deserved rookie of the year, but instead it went to Dodgers pitcher Hideo Nomo (who had pitched professionally in Japan). It turned out OK. Nomo won the rookie award.

    Chipper won a World Series ring.

    Nobody dared to dream the Braves would be in this type of position in March. But here we are, a team leading its division playing with the confidence of a championship contender, led in part by a kid who keeps making our jaws drop on a nightly basis.

    —30—

    Bud L. Ellis is a lifelong Braves fan who worked as a sports writer for daily newspapers throughout Georgia earlier in his writing career, with duties including covering the Atlanta Braves, the World Series and MLB’s All-Star Game. Ellis currently lives in the Atlanta suburbs and contributes his thoughts on Braves baseball and MLB for a variety of outlets. Reach him on Twitter at @bud006.